24 de fevereiro de 2013

Leituras Digitais (17 a 23 de Fevereiro)



Rubrica semanal de notícias e artigos relacionados com a edição de livros digitais.

This led me to wonder about authorial greatness and the problem of out of sight, out of mind. Authors like Dickens, Twain, Steinbeck, and Hemingway carved their greatness in an era in which their books would appear on library shelves (personal and public) and each time a person scanned the library shelf looking for a book, one of their books would present itself. This has begun to change with ebooks, especially with those books that are published only as ebooks. (Books that are also available as print-on-demand books but not as mass distributed pbooks are, for all intents and purposes, available only as ebooks and should be viewed that way.)
“It is the culmination of a trend we have seen building for five years,” said Cal Morgan, the editorial director of Harper Perennial Originals, who until last year ran a blog called Fifty-Two Stories, devoted to short fiction. “The Internet has made people a lot more open to reading story forms that are different from the novel, and you see a generation of writers very engaged in experimentation.”
“The idea came to me gradually. I was thinking about the potential of ebooks, and how to make books more interactive, the different types of books you could produce, but then the idea that you could pay as you read — well, that was far more interesting than everything else. So I did away with interactive books and all that. This seemed genuinely different.”
According to Master of Information Management and Systems (MIMS) student Jacob Hartnell, research on e-books will improve an inefficient system that is “app-based” instead of “Web-based.” He noted that existing e-books viewed on one device are often viewed differently or cannot be viewed at all on another device.
Hartnell and his team aim to harness a web-based platform, using the standardized Web language of HTML5, to create e-books as an alternative to private proprietary formats like Kindle and iBook.“The power of standards really solves the challenge for publishers of, ‘How do we make the content work on all sorts of different devices?’” Hartnell said. “We don’t want to waste time developing solutions for all these different devices. It makes books accessible to everyone regardless of what device you’re using.”
One thing that eBookPlus failed to mention is that 10 thousand downloads doesn’t mean 10 thousand people actually read the ebook and seeing the advertising. Anyone who studied the phenomenon of pirated ebooks could have told you that the actual engagement rate is low (5% is the high end). In other words a freely available for download ebook might get lots of downloads, but many of those potential readers are either going to add it to their existing hoard unread or they will simply lose it in the TBR pile.And when you combine the first caveat (low actual ad revenue) with the second caveat (low engagement rate) you end up with a situation where the average indie author is probably not going to make much money.
The vibe at SFWC is always positive, a top-down attitude that emanates directly from the amazing organizers Michael and Elizabeth Pomada, as well as a team of dozens of hard-working and enthusiastic volunteers.  Speaking with organizers it was apparent that the vibe for this, the 10th Anniversay of the conference, was the most positive ever.
The reason?  Self-publishing.  Self-publishing took front and center stage this year.  Writers left the conference confident that one way or another, their books will be published and available to readers. 
Throughout 2012, Amazon wooed publishers to participate in its “KDP Select” program, which allows Amazon Prime customers to borrow one Kindle edition per month for free, offering the publisher a share of a royalty pool, totaling at least $500,000 per month. By December 2012, the monthly pool had grown to $1.4 million, but the per-unit payout for e-books borrowed that month was only $1.88.Amazon announced in January that it would increase its “global fund” bonus for borrowed e-books from $1.5 million to $2.2 million during the three month period from December 2012 through February 2013. As a result, the monthly pool for borrowed e-books in January grew to $1.7 million, the largest in the history of the program. The per-unit payout for e-books borrowed in January climbed to $2.23.
In a case of David against Goliath, three independent US bookshops are taking on Amazon and six of the biggest publishers in America in a class-action lawsuit accusing the internet giant of creating an ebook monopoly that is destroying other booksellers.The lawsuit, posted online by the Huffington Post, was filed last Friday by the New York bookseller Book House of Stuyvesant Plaza, the South Carolina-based Fiction Addiction and New York City's Posman Books "on behalf of themselves and … all independent brick-and-mortar bookstores who sell ebooks". The case was filed against Amazon and the "big six" publishers – Random House, Penguin, Hachette, Simon & Schuster, HarperCollins and Macmillan – and alleges that contracts between Amazon and the publishers "unreasonably restrain trade and commerce in the market for ebooks".
On the internet, media formats easily cross boundaries – something we've all seen in recent times. In the news business, for example, what were once print-only newspapers now create videos, and television channels have added articles that could easily appear in print. Everyone is using new tools, such as map/sensor mashups, to create a vast variety of forms that are native to the online world. We can still identify a newspaper if it's dropped at our doorstep – and some of us still get the New York Times delivered on Sundays – but take it online and it's clearly something else.
The book's boundaries have moved as well, but not as far. It still functions as a linear, self-contained unit. It has a beginning, a middle and and end. It is unlikely that I can read it in one sitting, unless I'm on a particularly long plane ride, or so wrapped up in the text that I can't stop. In other words, a book still feels like the recognizable form of the past.
A Kickstarter project called The People’s E-Book needed $20K to fund  an ebook creation platform for artists, authors, and alternative presses who want to try new things, publish new books, and push into new territories. The People’s E-Book will handle ebooks of all sizes and scope, but it will excel in areas that no one else has cared to consider—the very small, the quick and dirty, the simple, and the experimental. The People’s E-book is a super-simple online tool with an intuitive visual interface to allow anyone to make ebooks quickly and for free. This is barebones ebook publishing. What the photocopier was to zines, we hope The People’s E-book will be to digital books.
Last year Kobo unveiled Writing Life, which is its seminal indie self-publishing platform. It has attracted many prominent authors, such as H.P. Mallory and Kevin J. Anderson. In the last few days, Kobo has quietly introduced the ability for authors to issue pre-orders for their ebooks. This adds a tremendous amount of versatility to promote your upcoming title before the official release date.Authors have two main options for uploading their book with a future release date. Basically, if an author, when they are ready to publish, WANTS to set a pre-order, they have the option of either keeping it hidden until the release date (the way Kobo used to do it), or making it available for pre-order so they can start selling it now and also build anticipation.
New York Times E-Book Best Sellers

A version of this list appears in the March 3, 2013 issue of The New York Times Book Review. Rankings reflect sales for the week ending February 16, 2013.

E-Book Fiction

1.     SAFE HAVEN, by Nicholas Sparks
2.     GUILT, by Jonathan Kellerman
3.     WAIT FOR ME, by Elisabeth Naughton
4.     A WEEK IN WINTER, by Maeve Binchy
5.     GONE GIRL, by Gillian Flynn

E-Book Nonfiction

1.     DRINKING AND TWEETING, by Brandi Glanville with Leslie Bruce
2.     AMERICAN SNIPER, by Chris Kyle with Scott McEwen and Jim DeFelice
3.     AMERICA THE BEAUTIFUL, by Ben C. Carson and Candy Carson
4.     PROOF OF HEAVEN, by Eben Alexander
5.     KILLING KENNEDY, by Bill O'Reilly and Martin Dugard
           
Wall Street Journal E-Book Best Sellers (Week Ended Feb. 17)

Nonfiction E-Books
TITLE
AUTHOR / PUBLISHER
THIS WEEK
LAST
WEEK
Drinking and Tweeting
1
New
Brandi Glanville with Leslie Bruce/Gallery Books
American Sniper
2
1
Chris Kyle with Scott McEwan, Jim DeFelice/HarperCollins
America the Beautiful
3
Ben Carson with Candy Carson/Zondervan
Proof of Heaven
4
6
Eben Alexander/Simon & Schuster
Life Code
5
New
Phil McGraw/Bird Street Books
The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People
6
5
Stephen R. Covey/Free Press
Slim for Life
7
New
Jillian Michaels/Crown Publishing Group
The Five Love Languages
8
Gary Chapman/Moody Publishers
Benghazi
9
New
Jack Murphy, Brandon Webb/HarperCollins
Killing Kennedy
10
Bill O'Reilly, Martin Dugard/Henry Holt & Co.

Fiction E-Books
TITLE
AUTHOR / PUBLISHER
THIS WEEK
LAST
WEEK
Beautiful Creatures
1
6
Kami Garcia, Margaret Stohl/Little, Brown Books for Young Readers
Safe Haven
2
1
Nicholas Sparks/Grand Central Publishing
Beautiful Darkness
3
Kami Garcia, Margaret Stohl/Little, Brown Books for Young Readers
Beautiful Chaos
4
Kami Garcia, Margaret Stohl/Little, Brown Books for Young Readers
Guilt
5
New
Jonathan Kellerman/Random House
Beautiful Redemption
6
Kami Garcia, Margaret Stohl/Little, Brown Books for Young Readers
Wait for Me
7
4
Elisabeth Naughton/Elisabeth Naughton
A Week in Winter
8
New
Maeve Binchy/Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
Gone Girl
9
5
Gillian Flynn/Crown Publishing Group
Rush
10
3
Maya Banks/Penguin Group

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