13 de janeiro de 2013

Leituras Digitais (6 a 12 de Janeiro de 2013)



Rubrica semanal de notícias e artigos relacionados com a edição de livros digitais.

The ebook market increasingly runs on a wholesale model. Here's how it works: the publisher produces a book and sets an RRP of, say, £10. The retailer then says: we need this book from you at, say, 55 per cent discount. So the publisher gets £4.50 per book and the retailer then sells it for whatever it wants. The 20p ebooks represent a huge percentage loss for the retailer. So why do it? "Because it allows them to consolidate their market share" says Kate Poole, deputy chief executive of the Society of Authors, "then in future when they may increase the price"
Kate Poole worries about the devaluation of ebook and books in general by this sort of action. "Because ebooks have no physical manifestation it is harder for consumers to perceive the production cost that have gone into them – 20p could eventually be seen as the benchmark price". Although Sony points out there are "only a small selection of great titles available" and that it is "confident the British reading public is able to discern that a handful of ebooks at 20p does not make 20p the new price for ebooks."
Earlier today I spoke with Richard Stephenson, founder of Yudu, a not-so-new start-up from the UK that has an interesting point of view on the future of illustrated digital titles. Stephenson believes that illustrated digital titles will take off with consumers when publishers build several of the same type and sell them through a proprietary app. This is contingent upon the publishers creating more interesting, beautiful and interactive illustrated titles than they have to date.
The big chains deserve opprobrium for their vicious tactics against America’s independent booksellers, certainly. Back in the last century, I wrote a column attacking B&N for putting indie booksellers in Melville House’s birthplace, Hoboken, New Jersey, out of business with under-pricing, as if selling books was like selling widgets. Can you guess the rest of that story? Having poisoned the well, the Hoboken B&N itself went out of business, leaving the town — a big Manhattan bedroom with lots of well-educated, well-off residents — without a bookshop, probably forever.
And yet, and yet … that development gave me no pleasure, nor does the fact that this scenario is playing out across the country with increasing frequency. And my brother and sister indie fanatics shouldn’t get too righteous about it either. Two thousand fewer places for people to be exposed to books is pretty obviously not good for our culture.
This paper presents the results of a quantitative and systematic investigation exploring online e-book usage at the J.N. Desmarais Library of Laurentian University over a 9-year period. The size of an e-book collection was determined to show evidence of an extremely strong relationship with the level of usage e-books experienced. Of all factors examined during the course of this study, it was the size of the collection that exhibited the strongest association to usage levels and would suggest just how important the size and content of a collection can be to patron acceptance and utilization. Of all student academic levels, doctoral students exhibited the strongest relationship with e-book usage, while undergraduate students showed signs of the weakest. Faculty demonstrated the overall weakest relationship with e-book usage.
PlasticLogic may have overstated the involvement they had with the PaperTab flexible tablet, but they did have a couple interesting gadgets of their own to show off.
In addition to the lighted PL screen we’ve seen before and a watch, there was also a dual screen ereader concept. It’s tied to a cable and can’t do more than play a slideshow of page images, but thanks to PlasticLogic’s screen tech it is also quite thin.
Effective January 15, 2013, Lulu will no longer offer Adobe’s Digital Editions DRM as an option when publishing or revising eBook content in EPUB and PDF formats. DRM works best when administered by those who control how content is purchased and viewed. Companies like Amazon, Apple and Barnes & Noble integrate a reader’s experience from purchasing to downloading and finally to reading. These companies do a fantastic job in this area, and eBooks published through Lulu and distributed through these retail sites will continue to have the same rights management applied as they do today.
The average price of a top-25 ebook best-seller has plummeted in the past several months, dropping from a high of $11.37 in last Oct. to $8.23 this week (see chart below).
Since gaining control of the power to discount titles from some of the largest publishers, Amazon, Barnes & Noble and others have been dropping the prices of best-selling titles from $14.99 and $12.99 to points much lower — sometimes to below $5.
Esta decisão avança independentemente da Declaração Europeia sobre e-books que considera a possibilidade de tornar os e-books bens elegíveis para taxa de IVA reduzida, mas cujas propostas legislativas não terão lugar antes do final de 2013. Fica deste modo adiada a promoção da leitura em novos suportes e mais um dos factores de dinamização do mercado.
Unfortunately, most agents were unable to grasp the implications of the new technology, but who can blame them? The publishers couldn’t either. Even when the first practical e-reader, the Rocket Book, was introduced in 1998, after a flurry of end-of-publishing-as-we-know-it hoopla the book industry continued doing business as usual, and e-books were scorned as flash-in-the-pan gadgets like that other dumb portable invention, the Walkman, precursor of the iPod. But I had no sooner watched a demo of the Rocket Book than I determined to be present at the creation as it were, and I started an e-book company the next year. Because publishers weren’t gazing into the crystal ball, I was able to recover the rights to many out of print books, and I urged fellow agents to follow suit. I knew that window for recovery of authors’ backlists would eventually close. Which it did.
It would take fifteen years from publication of the AAR article for digital technology to be refined and the publishing industry to embrace digital books. Then the Kindle happened and, at last, everybody got it.
For The Human Division, the latest novel in John Scalzi's Old Man's War series, Tor is teasing the hardcover with staggered digital "episodes." The book is coming out in print (and, simultaneously, in e-book) in May 2013 but, before then, in a first, Tor is releasing the story through a series of e-books, the first of which, called "The B-Team," will be on sale January 15.
The episodes, as Tor is calling each installment, will be released on a weekly basis over the next three months. The first three episodes, all coming out in January, are each priced at 99 cents. Tor said the teaser approach is "an experiment." But the language the house is using, linking a print book to a TV show, is intentional, as senior editor Patrick Nielsen Hayden explained. "Like the episodes of a good high-end cable drama, each [e-serial] has enough internal integrity to work as an enjoyable chunk of story on its own, but each will advance a ‘season’-long storyline as well."
The European Commission has announced the latest funding call (call 7) in the ICT Policy Support Programme (ICT PSP), offering up to €125.7m in new funding for digital projects across Europe. Of this, €36m is allocated to a strand which directly addresses the digital work of museums, archives, libraries and creative media organisations.

The ICT Policy Support Programme is a key funding programme in the Digital Agenda for Europe. Its objective is to stimulate smart, sustainable and inclusive growth by promoting the use of digital technology by European businesses and citizens.
New York Times E-Book Best Sellers

A version of this list appears in the January 20, 2013 issue of The New York Times Book Review. Rankings reflect sales for the week ending January 5, 2013.

E-Book Fiction

1.     HOPELESS, by Colleen Hoover
2.     SAFE HAVEN, by Nicholas Sparks
3.     GONE GIRL, by Gillian Flynn
4.     THE COINCIDENCE OF CALLIE AND KAYDEN, by Jessica Sorensen
5.     FIFTY SHADES OF GREY, by E. L. James

E-Book Nonfiction

1.     PROOF OF HEAVEN, by Eben Alexander
2.     KILLING KENNEDY, by Bill O'Reilly and Martin Dugard
3.     THE OMNIVORE'S DILEMMA, by Michael Pollan
4.     LET’S PRETEND THIS NEVER HAPPENED, by Jenny Lawson
5.     KILLING LINCOLN, by Bill O'Reilly and Martin Dugard
           
Wall Street Journal E-Book Best Sellers (Week Ended Dec. 23)

Nonfiction E-Books
TITLE
AUTHOR / PUBLISHER
THIS WEEK
LAST
WEEK
Man's Search for Meaning
1
Viktor E. Frankl/Beacon Press
Shred
2
New
Ian K. Smith/St. Martin's Press
Proof of Heaven
3
3
Eben Alexander/Simon & Schuster
Killing Kennedy
4
2
Bill O'Reilly, Martin Dugard/Henry Holt & Co.
The Omnivore's Dilemma
5
Michael Pollan/Penguin Group
The 8-Hour Diet
6
David Zinczenko with Peter Moore/Rodale Press
Let's Pretend This Never Happened
7
4
Jenny Lawson/Penguin Group
Killing Lincoln
8
5
Bill O'Reilly, Martin Dugard/Henry Holt & Co.
No Easy Day
9
6
Mark Owen with Kevin Maurer/Penguin Group
I Suck at Girls
10
7
Justin Halpern/HarperCollins

Fiction E-Books
TITLE
AUTHOR / PUBLISHER
THIS WEEK
LAST
WEEK
Hopeless
1
6
Colleen Hoover/Colleen Hoover
Safe Haven
2
1
Nicholas Sparks/Grand Central Publishing
Gone Girl
3
3
Gillian Flynn/Crown Publishing Group
The Coincidence of Callie and Kayden
4
2
Jessica Sorenson/Jessica Sorenson
Fifty Shades of Grey
5
7
E.L. James/Vintage Books
Fifty Shades Darker
6
E.L. James/Vintage Books
The Hobbit
7
4
J.R.R. Tolkien/Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Someone to Love
8
Addison Moore/Addison Moore
The Perks of Being a Wallflower
9
5
Stephen Chbosky/MTV Books
Fifty Shades Freed
10
E.L. James/Vintage Books


Vídeos

PaperTab: Revolutionary paper tablet

eBooks From Your Public Library on Your TV

How E Ink matrix and segmented displays are built

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