27 de janeiro de 2013

Leituras Digitais (20 a 26 de Janeiro)



Rubrica semanal de notícias e artigos relacionados com a edição de livros digitais.

Amazon is buying Liquavista. Or at the very least they are buying part of the company (making a major investment) and plan to use Liquavista’s screen in the next Kindle.Samsung bought Liquavista in early 2011, and quickly renamed the company Liquavista/SNRC (Samsung Netherlands Research Center). They’ve been funding research at Liquavista for the past couple years but so far as I know they have not actually released a device which used a Liquavista screen. This tech is going to have the same color qualities as LCDs while also being much more energy-efficient. It’s been under development for 10 years now and was supposed to enter mass production in 2010, 2011, and this year (it keeps getting pushed back).
A report released by Scholastic early in 2013 carries an ostensibly encouraging report that children between 6 and 17 are turning in greater numbers to e-books. Forty-six percent of the children polled said they had read at least one e-book, twice the number of those surveyed in 2010. In particular, boys, who “traditionally lag behind girls in reading” in the words of Leslie Kaufman of the New York Times, were showing greater attachment to the medium.
Brasília – O Programa Nacional do Livro Didático (PNLD) abre hoje (21) o período para inscrições de obras destinadas a alunos e professores do ensino médio da rede pública para o ano letivo de 2015. A partir de agora, as editoras também poderão inscrever livros digitais – cujo acesso pode ser feito em computadores ou em tablets.
A versão digital deve vir acompanhada do livro impresso, ter o mesmo conteúdo e incluir conteúdos educacionais digitais como vídeos, animações, simuladores, imagens e jogos para auxiliar na aprendizagem. Continua permitida a apresentação de obras somente na versão impressa para viabilizar a participação das editoras que ainda não dominam as novas tecnologias.
The literary website the Millions is getting into the e-book business: Starting Tuesday, it will publish e-books that are available on Amazon.com, in Apple's iBookstore and at Barnes & Noble. While its website is about books, authors and publishing, its e-books will move into other realms.The Millions' debut is "Epic Fail: Bad Art, Viral Fame and the History of the Worst Thing Ever" by Mark O'Connell. It's a long essay that begins with the botched Jesus fresco repair that looked like a monkey, moves to Susan Sontag's "On Camp" and goes on from there.
Perhaps the most groundbreaking aspect of “Library Services in the Digital Age,” the report released today by the Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project is how non-groundbreaking its findings are.Based on “a survey of 2,252 Americans ages 16 and above” conducted between October 15 and November 10 of last year, the Pew report assures us that, even in the digital age, libraries continue to serve a variety of functions, with nearly 60% of respondents having had some kind of interaction with a library in the last 12 months, and 91% saying that “public libraries are important to their communities.”
One of the most underappreciated realities of the book business is how hard it is for a retailer to manage an inventory of trade books.This is an existential problem for a bookstore. A bookstore’s inventory is its biggest investment. The performance of inventory — how many times it “turns” in a year and how successfully the store manages to buy what it needs without wasting investment (tying up cash) and incurring margin-destroying revenueless-costs (return freight, probably added to inbound freight, plus wasted labor shelving, removing, packing, and shipping) — is, by far, the single biggest determinant of whether a store succeeds commercially or fails.
Kobo has appointed former Apple sales director Jean-Marc Dupuis to oversee its European expansion, which is a “top priority” for the company.Kobo said Dupuis was “instrumental” in Apple doubling its revenue in Europe and has now hired him as its new managing director for EMEA. He will be based in Paris.
At the Digital Book World conference, held in New York last week, one could hardly pass muster by holding up a stack of pages bound together. The crowd’s sensibility was more conceptual; the word that filled the air was “content.” This was a fairground for companies like Innodata, DigiServ, Biztegra, and Datamatics, with booths snaking through the hallways of the Hilton Hotel. They passed out business cards and flowcharts, decked out with spritely taglines: “Unleash your inner book ~ just $99.” In a conference room, Linda Holliday, the C.E.O. of a digital publishing company called Semi-Linear, leaned against a presenter’s table, having just wrapped up a panel discussion on “Making Content Searchable, Findable, and Shareable.” She spoke in an excited stream. “A book is an amount of knowledge that I feel good about finishing,” she told me. “A book is a clump of knowledge that goes together.”
As magazines make the transition from print to pixels, some publishers are using the move as an opportunity to jack up their prices - in some cases, to more than they were charging for print editions. And that's for tablet versions that are too often crappy afterthoughts.
To be fair, magazines are contending with legitimate financial concerns. Their advertising revenue has been declining and the historically discounted subscription rates they've charged for print delivery just aren't enough to pay the freight. To cope, many publishers are asking readers to chip in more - on digital versions as well as print editions.There are some problems with driving up prices too much, though.
The UK team encoded a scholarly paper, a photo, Shakespeare's sonnets and a portion of Martin Luther King's I Have A Dream speech in artificially produced segments of the "life molecule".The information was then read back out with 100% accuracy.It is possible to store huge volumes of data in DNA for thousands of years, the researchers write in Nature magazine.They acknowledge that the costs involved in synthesizing the molecule in the lab make this type of information storage "breathtakingly expensive" at the moment, but argue that newer, faster technologies will soon make it much more affordable, especially for long-term archiving.
Stephen King has never been afraid of trying new ways to sell content to readers. He was one of the first mainstream authors to publish a book online (the marginally unsuccessful The Plant in 2000), one of the first to offer a Kindle Exclusive ebook (UR in 2009), and last year he even decided to try piracy as a promotional tool.Today Amazon announced that Mr King has written and released a Kindle Single. Guns is a 22 page long essay which sums up the author’s views on firearms and gun violence in the US. “I think the issue of an America awash in guns is one every citizen has to think about,” said King. “If this helps provoke constructive debate, I’ve done my job. Once I finished writing ‘Guns’ I wanted it published quickly, and Kindle Singles provided an excellent fit.”
New York Times E-Book Best Sellers

A version of this list appears in the February 3, 2013 issue of The New York Times Book Review. Rankings reflect sales for the week ending January 19, 2013.

E-Book Fiction

1.     HOPELESS, by Colleen Hoover
2.     SAFE HAVEN, by Nicholas Sparks
3.     GONE GIRL, by Gillian Flynn
4.     THE FIFTH ASSASSIN, by Brad Meltzer
5.     SOMEONE TO LOVE, by Addison Moore

E-Book Nonfiction

1.     PROOF OF HEAVEN, by Eben Alexander
2.     GOING CLEAR, by Lawrence Wright
3.     KILLING KENNEDY, by Bill O'Reilly and Martin Dugard
4.     NO EASY DAY, by Mark Owen with Kevin Maurer
5.     MY BELOVED WORLD, by Sonia Sotomayor
           
Wall Street Journal E-Book Best Sellers (Week Ended Jan. 20)

Nonfiction E-Books
TITLE
AUTHOR / PUBLISHER
THIS WEEK
LAST
WEEK
Breaking Night
1
Liz Murray/Hyperion
Brain Rules
2
John Medina/Pear Press
Proof of Heaven
3
1
Eben Alexander/Simon & Schuster
Going Clear
4
New
Lawrence Wright/Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
Shred
5
2
Ian K. Smith/St. Martin's Press
Killing Kennedy
6
4
Bill O'Reilly, Martin Dugard/Henry Holt & Co.
No Easy Day
7
6
Mark Owen with Kevin Maurer/Penguin Group
Merle's Door
8
Ted Kerasote/Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Cry Silent Tears
9
Joe Peters/HarperCollins
Killing Lincoln
10
xx
Bill O'Reilly, Martin Dugard/Henry Holt & Co.

Fiction E-Books
TITLE
AUTHOR / PUBLISHER
THIS WEEK
LAST
WEEK
Hopeless
1
1
Colleen Hoover/Colleen Hoover
Save Haven
2
2
Nicholas Sparks/Grand Central Publishing
Gone Girl
3
3
Gillian Flynn/Crown Publishing Group
Someone to Love
4
7
Addison Moore/Addison Moore
The Fifth Assassin
5
New
Brad Meltzer/Grand Central Publishing
Beautiful Creatures
6
Kami Garcia, Margaret Stohl/Little, Brown Books for Young Readers
The Coincidence of Callie and Kayden
7
5
Jessica Sorenson/Jessica Sorenson
The Forgotten
8
10
David Baldacci/Grand Central Publishing
Fifty Shades of Grey
9
8
E.L. James/Vintage Books
Fifty Shades Freed
10
E.L. James/Vintage Books

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