30 de dezembro de 2012

Leituras Digitais (23 a 29 de Dezembro)



Rubrica semanal de notícias e artigos relacionados com a edição de livros digitais.

The number of high street bookshops in Britain has more than halved in just seven years due to the rise of e-books and the consumer downturn, research for The Daily Telegraph has found.
The percentage of adult Americans who read a book this fall fell to 75% from 78% a year ago, according to new survey findings by the Pew Research Center released December 27. The survey of Americans age 16 and older found that 23% of people in the age bracket read e-books in the previous 12 months, up from 16% a year ago, while the percentage who read print books fell to 67% from 72%.

The survey, from the Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project, was conducted from October 15-November 10 among 2,252 Americans 16 and up. The increase in e-book reading was fueled by higher ownership of digital reading devices, with the survey finding that 33% of Americans 16 and up had either a dedicated e-reader or a tablet, up from 18% in late 2011.
But you’re an Ars reader, and you actually know (and care!) what DRM stands for. After all, we’ve been covering digital rights management for years, ever since it was a contentious issue in the music industry. You may recall that Amazon itself led the charge against Cupertino, challenging iTunes with cheaper downloads and a lack of DRM. But Amazon's lead in the fight against music DRM was a business decision rather than an ideological stance. You may remember our story from late October 2012, detailing how to strip DRM off of Amazon Kindle purchases as a means of backing up your titles and preventing Amazon from deleting your entire library on a whim.

And that leaves this question: where’s the DRM outrage over e-books? Or put another way, why doesn’t Amazon care about eliminating DRM for books, when it did for music?
The top six best-selling ebooks of 2012 are all part of the Fifty Shades and Hunger Games trilogies. One interesting thing about these two trilogies as top sellers is that one is all about sex and discretely for adults and the other awkwardly avoids mentions of sex and was directed toward a younger audience.

At the same time, they are connected in that the ability to buy them through their reading devices and read them privately helped propel their success. Would Fifty Shades been nearly as popular if readers had to enter bookstores to buy the books and display that they were reading them every time they did? Would Hunger Games have been as popular if readers had to visit the children’s section of a bookstore to buy them?

We’ll never know. But, undoubtedly, the rise of e-reading helped drive each of these titles to incredible sales.
Books are changing. Media is changing. The way we read is changing. In order for those things to happen we need to abandon tools that replicate the old and embrace new devices. Ereaders made a fine halfway point between reading on a tablet and reading a paper-based book. In fact, they rejuvenated book sales by allowing impulse payments for the first time. But even if you think the future of the book will be dominated by text, their time has now passed.
Self-publishing has been propelled by print on demand technologies that have made it possible to produce books to order and thus control the investment in book inventory.  But many authors have discovered to their dismay that distribution, publicity and marketing can still be an expensive proposition.
Amazon Prime for eBooks was released in November 2011, around the same time most of the lending websites started experiencing problems. Amazon allows people who pay the $70 annual fee to have access to one free eBook a month. Authors actually make money when people borrow their books for free via Amazon, and make nothing when their book is shared between friends on book lending websites. This obviously is in an authors best interest to promote the fact their book is on Prime, because in many cases, lending your book out for free makes you more money then selling it for .99.

The one problem with most eBook lending websites is that there is only a few copies of the most popular books, at any given time. The entire lending system was developed so that once a book was loaned out once, it can never be lent out again. Many users are obviously gravitating towards Amazon Prime and the book lending sites are not seeing enough new blood being added to make up for all the best books expiring off their system. Prime books are basically infinite, and millions of users can borrow the same book if they wanted to.
Traditional print book covers draw many parallels with billboards and conventional marketing to appeal to casual readers. When you walk into a bookstore and there are thousands of books present, they start to all blur together. Bright colorful images and racy cover art are increasingly becoming more bold to grab people’s attention and hopefully prompt an impulse buy. When indie authors self-publish and release digital firsts, how important is cover art? Weighing in on the issue are some of  the top digital publishing companies and best selling authors.
For the most part, the magazine industry has perceived digital publishing as a great unknown, unsure of whether the upheaval to their familiar way of life will be worth the effort, expense and re-engineering of their decades-old processes. While some have clung to the tired notion that digital is a threat and that they must figure out how to compete against it to remain relevant, most recognize there is tremendous opportunity--but also that they are ill-prepared to capitalize on it.

The digital discussion often results in more questions than answers: will we make more money going digital? How will going digital affect the business in the long run? What kind of impact will we see in circulation or advertising by going digital?
New York Times E-Book Best Sellers

A version of this list appears in the January 6, 2013 issue of The New York Times Book Review. Rankings reflect sales for the week ending December 22, 2012.

E-Book Fiction

1.     GONE GIRL, by Gillian Flynn
2.     THE FORGOTTEN, by David Baldacci
3.     SAFE HAVEN, by Nicholas Sparks
4.     THE COINCIDENCE OF CALLIE AND KAYDEN, by Jessica Sorensen
5.     MERRY CHRISTMAS, ALEX CROSS, by James Patterson

E-Book Nonfiction

1.     PROOF OF HEAVEN, by Eben Alexander
2.     THE END OF THE LINE, by Glenn Thrush and Jonathan Martin
3.     KILLING KENNEDY, by Bill O'Reilly and Martin Dugard
4.     OUTLAW PLATOON, by Sean Parnell with John R. Bruning
5.     NO EASY DAY, by Mark Owen with Kevin Maurer
           
Wall Street Journal E-Book Best Sellers (Week Ended Dec. 23)

Nonfiction E-Books
TITLE
AUTHOR / PUBLISHER
THIS WEEK
LAST
WEEK
Proof of Heaven
1
1
Eben Alexander/Simon & Schuster
The End of the Line
2
new
Glenn Thrush, Jonathan Martin/Random House
Killing Kennedy
3
2
Bill O'Reilly, Martin Dugard/Henry Holt & Co.
Always Looking Up
4
--
Michael J. Fox/Hyperion
Outlaw Platoon
5
--
Sean Parnell with John Bruning/HarperCollins
No Easy Day
6
7
Mark Owen with Kevin Maurer/Penguin Group
Killing Lincoln
7
3
Bill O'Reilly, Martin Dugard/Henry Holt & Co.
Team of Rivals
8
4
Doris Kearns Goodwin/Simon & Schuster
Thomas Jefferson
9
5
Jon Meacham/Random House
Behind the Beautiful Forevers
10
--
Katherine Boo/Random House

Fiction E-Books
TITLE
AUTHOR / PUBLISHER
THIS WEEK
LAST
WEEK
The Hobbit
1
4
J.R.R. Tolkien/Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Gone Girl
2
5
Gillian Flynn/Crown Publishing Group
The Forgotten
3
3
David Baldacci/Grand Central Publishing
The Coincidence of Callie and Kayden
4
new
Jessica Sorensen/Jessica Sorensen
Safe Haven
5
new
Nicholas Sparks/Grand Central Publishing
Merry Christmas, Alex Cross
6
8
James Patterson/Little, Brown
Fallen Too Far
7
new
Abbi Glines/Abbi Glines
The Racketeer
8
9
John Grisham/Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
11/22/63
9
--
Stephen King/Gallery Books
Fifty Shades of Grey
10
--
E.L. James/Vintage Books

29 de dezembro de 2012

Reportagem sobre as bibliotecas itinerantes da Gulbenkian


Percorreram milhões quilómetros, levaram resmas de livros a quase todos os cantos do país. As carrinhas, de chapa ondulada, que durante 44 anos garantiram o serviço da biblioteca itinerante da fundação Calouste Gulbenkian, estão paradas há dez anos.
A reportagem, de Ricardo Oliveira Duarte, está disponível no website da TSF.

28 de dezembro de 2012

Studies in Gothic Fiction: Volume 2 Issue 2



A Zittaw Press acaba de lançar mais um número do Studies in Gothic Fiction. Esta edição inclui os seguintes artigos:

Isabella Kelly’s Twist on the Standard Radcliffean Romance 
by Tenille Nowak

Rendering the Vampire’s Reflection: Documents as Images in Stoker’s Dracula 
by Andrew Grace

Home is Where the Horror Is 
by William D. Prystauk

The Splitting of Mind and Matter as in a Dream: Poe’s “Ligeia” 
by Crystal C. Coombes

A Descent into a Masculine, Allegorical Space: Gender in Edgar Allan Poe’s No-Tell Tales 
by Estella Gutierrez-Zamano

O download pode ser efectuado aqui.

27 de dezembro de 2012

Kobo Glo disponível nas lojas Fnac



O Kobo Glo já se encontra disponível nas lojas Fnac. Aproveito a ocasião para recordar a análise que fiz a este eReader, constituída pelas seguintes partes:
Podem também consultar a galeria de fotos.

23 de dezembro de 2012

Leituras Digitais (16 a 22 de Dezembro)



Rubrica semanal de notícias e artigos relacionados com a edição de livros digitais.

E-readers are screwed.That's the main takeaway from Wednesdays ominously worded report from IHS, anyway. The numbers are pretty dramatic: By the end of the year, sales of dedicated ebook reading devices will have dropped 36% from 2011. Come 2016, says IHS, total e-reader sale volume will be just two-thirds of what it was last year.Yikes. Is this really the death of e-readers?
Last year, Cambridge University released digital versions of Isaac Newton’s manuscripts and notebooks. The university also launched a new website which showed a digital version of a 2,000 year-old copy of the Ten Commandments and one of the oldest copies of the New Testament. Cambridge is now continuing this program with the release of digital copies of more manuscripts.Some of these include the tenth-century Book of Deer, which is probably the oldest surviving Scottish manuscript and contains the earliest known examples of written Gaelic; the thirteenth-century Life of Edward the Confessor, which contains masterpieces of illumination; the Cairo Genizah collections, which are glimpses into the everyday live of a Jewish community in Egypt over a period of 1,000 years; digital versions of its Islamic and Sanskrit collections of both secular and religious texts, including some of the earliest surviving Qur’ans; the Nash Papyrus, which contains one of the oldest texts from the Hebrew Bible, the Codex Bezzae, one of the most important New Testament manuscripts; and others.
A Comissão Europeia aceitou as condições propostas pela Apple e por quatro editoras de livros eletrónicos, pondo fim ao processo de investigação às práticas anti concorrenciais das empresas. A decisão já era esperada e foi hoje confirmada numa nota de imprensa. O processo de investigação teve início no final do ano passado e visou apurar os efeitos negativos para o mercado de um conjunto de alterações incorporadas pelas editoras no seu relacionamento comercial com a Apple no domínio dos ebooks.
As empresas já se tinham mostrado disponíveis para alterar regras, apresentando propostas que a Comissão Europeia testou e sobre as quais pediu opinião ao mercado, através de uma consulta pública realizada em setembro. Agora confirma-se que as medidas propostas resolvem os principais receios europeus e repõem as condições adequadas de mercado.
The New York Times today announced the launch of two publishing programs — New York Times short e-books co-published with the digital startup Byliner, and TimesFiles with Vook.In collaboration with Byliner, The Times will co-publish up to a dozen New York Times / Byliner Originals in the next year featuring narratives in areas in which The Times has reporting expertise including culture, sports, business, science and health. While sometimes growing out of related Times reporting, the titles will offer new and original content that is not available in the paper or on NYTimes.com. The Originals will range from 10,000 to 20,000 words in length and are designed to be read in one sitting.
Last week’s International Conference held by the UK Publishers Association in London looked at “New Territories, New Audiences,” with a particular focus on the trio of Korea, Indonesia and Turkey.
Here’s a modest proposal about how marketers at big publishers should be organized.By audience segment, or, to use my own favored terminology, by vertical.Marketing demands it and entirely new business opportunities — beyond publishing — can arise from it.
Rights and content licensing for books remains a fairly dormant business. IPR License is a platform looking to unlock that potential revenue.
A transição para a era digital é a mais radical transformação da nossa história intelectual desde a invenção do alfabeto grego. Sim, o momento é histórico: há mudanças profundas na leitura, na escrita - e talvez até dentro do cérebro humano.
Like the record industry before it, the publishing industry is changing dramatically.  Of the Big Seven publishers (Random House, HarperCollins, MacMillan, Penguin, Simon & Schuster, Hachette Book Group (Little, Brown & Co, et al), and Scholastic), six of them–all but Scholastic– have proven to be too big to change their business strategy in a rapidly changing marketplace.  As with the record industry where changes to the labels were presaged by the demise of beloved chain stores (Sam Goody’s, Tower Records), the book industry saw the bankruptcy of Borders/Waldenbooks shutter nearly 1250 stores from its high point in 2003, when the last Borders stores closed on September 18, 2011.  Both major record labels and these major publishers have slowly changed how they do business, while smaller, niche labels and publishers have sprouted around them, and artists (both musical and literary) have opted for the control that self-releasing their work allows.
As we all know, the new norm is that in the next week there will be recorded a big surge in purchases in e-book reading hardware (including tablets, which are not just for reading). This will be followed, of course, by a surge in purchases of e-books.But what about between the surges? What’s the new level of purchase? The assumption is certainly that each surge builds on itself to increase the overall level of e-book use and purchase … is this true?Before this surge hits, I thought it would be interesting to take a look at just a couple of the countless reporting of statistics and opinions, and also at something that might have a big post-surge impact.
New York Times E-Book Best Sellers

A version of this list appears in the December 30, 2012 issue of The New York Times Book Review. Rankings reflect sales for the week ending December 15, 2012.

E-Book Fiction

1.     TWO GRAVES, by Douglas Preston and Lincoln Child
2.     THE EDGE OF NEVER, by J.A. Redmerski
3.     THE FORGOTTEN, by David Baldacci
4.     GONE GIRL, by Gillian Flynn
5.     THE BLACK BOX, by Michael Connelly

E-Book Nonfiction

1.     PROOF OF HEAVEN, by Eben Alexander
2.     KILLING KENNEDY, by Bill O'Reilly and Martin Dugard
3.     KILLING LINCOLN, by Bill O'Reilly and Martin Dugard
4.     THOMAS JEFFERSON, by Jon Meacham
5.     DAMAGED, by Cathy Glass
           
Wall Street Journal E-Book Best Sellers (Week Ended Dec. 16)

Nonfiction E-Books
TITLE
AUTHOR / PUBLISHER
THIS WEEK
LAST
WEEK
Proof of Heaven
1
1
Eben Alexander/Simon & Schuster
Killing Kennedy
2
2
Bill O'Reilly, Martin Dugard/Henry Holt & Co.
Killing Lincoln
3
6
Bill O'Reilly, Martin Dugard/Henry Holt & Co.
Team of Rivals
4
4
Doris Kearns Goodwin/Simon & Schuster
Thomas Jefferson
5
9
Jon Meacham/Random House
Damaged
6
8
Cathy Glass/HarperCollins
No Easy Day
7
Mark Owen with Kevin Maurer/Penguin Group
Eat to Live
8
3
Joel Fuhrman/Little, Brown
Wheat Belly
9
5
William Davis/Rodale
I Shouldn't Even Be Doing This!
10
Bob Newhart/Hyperion

Fiction E-Books
TITLE
AUTHOR / PUBLISHER
THIS WEEK
LAST
WEEK
Two Graves
1
New
Douglas Preston, Lincoln Child/Grand Central Publishing
The Edge of Never
2
2
J.A. Redmerski/J.A. Redmerski
The Forgotten
3
4
David Baldacci/Grand Central Publishing
The Hobbit
4
J.R.R. Tolkien/Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Gone Girl
5
7
Gillian Flynn/Crown Publishing Group
Wallbanger
6
6
Alice Clayton/Alice Clayton
The Black Box
7
5
Michael Connelly/Little, Brown
Merry Christmas, Alex Cross
8
9
James Patterson/Little, Brown
The Racketeer
9
John Grisham/Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
Notorious Nineteen
10
10
Janet Evanovich/Random House

20 de dezembro de 2012

Blimunda n.º 7


Somos a memória que temos,sem memória não saberíamos quem somos.
José Saramago

Blimunda 7, segundo número com concepção gráfica de Jorge Silva/Silva Designers, chega com o seu tema de capa dedicado à Memória, a memória de que necessitamos para sabermos quem somos. E, com as palavras de Sara Figueiredo Costa, a memória na Blimundarevisita Istambul e o Museu da Inocência, casa dos objectos elencados na obra homónima de Orhan Pamuk. Mas a memória faz-se também daqueles que desapareceram. Visitámos um cemitério de Lisboa e através das imagens de Sílvia Moldes traçamos um roteiro pelas memórias daqueles que todos os anos, a 1 de novembro, aí se dirigem para homenagear os que, mesmo que apenas fisicamente, já não estão entre nós. E se por ordem do Governo da República Portuguesa o dia 1 de novembro deixará, em 2013, de ser feriado nacional, esta é, também, uma afirmação política.
No infantil e juvenil, Andreia Brites revisita a tradição através de dois livros recentemente publicados que fazem pontes com a tradição ancestral das histórias que todos conhecemos.
Blimunda despede-se de 2012, desejando a todos os seus leitores um Bom 2013.
Disponível para download aqui.

Programa Nativos Digitais sobre eBooks



A emissão de 4 de Dezembro de 2012 do programa Nativos Digitais foi dedicada às mudanças que os eBooks provocaram no mercado editorial. O programa pode ser visualizado no website da RTP.

16 de dezembro de 2012

Leituras Digitais (9 a 15 de Dezembro)



Rubrica semanal de notícias e artigos relacionados com a edição de livros digitais.

eBooks are both a blessing and a curse as regards promotion of literacy. That anyone who has access to a keyboard can suddenly become an author is a curse; that readers pick up and read a lot of the produced drivel is a curse; that these same readers and authors do not recognize the difference between, for example, your and you’re is a curse; that readers are more interested in being distracted from reading than from actually reading is a curse.On the other hand, ebooks make material to read more accessible to more people at a lower cost, definitely a blessing. In addition, because ereaders offer such things as instant dictionary access and online access to websites like Wikipedia where more information is available about a topic, ebooks can be viewed as spreaders of knowledge, which is also a blessing.
Want to lend a copy of a book you love to your friend, but you only bought the eBook? Check out Ownshelf, a new service that will let you share ePUB titles with your friends across devices. The tool, which is currently in beta, lets you show friends your digital book shelves and look at your friends’ bookshelves, and borrow and loan titles from these digital bookshelves.
In the past few months, we’ve seen Amazon, Barnes & Noble and others discount HarperCollins ebooks. Now, they are discounting Hachette and Simon & Schuster ebooks, too. Mostly, Amazon has lowered its prices and other retailers have quickly moved to copy the Amazon price. As a result, the average price of a top-25 ebook best-seller is at its lowest point since Digital Book World started measuring it this summer: $9.06. But it’s doubtful this situation will last long.I think we’re going to see a much more diverse ebook pricing marketplace, with retailers angling to eke out advantages against each other whenever possible.
Lately, however, the fog of uncertainty has begun to lift. Ebooks may, or may not, inadvertently sponsor hardback sales (as ebook browsers opt for a more lasting and tangible experience). There is, however, no doubt that ebooks, which are decimating paperback sales, have now become the established, contemporary mass market for books. Meanwhile, the hardback remains the elite format.
As you could probably guess from E-ink’s quarterly statements, this has not been a banner year for ereaders. The screen tech company has reported a marked drop in income, indicating that fewer ereaders were being made this year than last.And if iSuppli’s projections prove true, next year’s ereader market is going to look even worse.This market research firm has released a new set of projections today that predict that there will be a 27% decline next year. They’re projecting that only about 15 million ereaders will be shipped this calendar year, down by over a third from last year’s peak of 23.2 million units. Next year’s shipments are projected to total around 11 million units.
This column is the first in a two-part series about libraries and their role in the marketing and readership of books.  This first part addresses the present conflict.  The second part will look forward to the future for libraries and publishers and the important challenges that they must address.
Online retail giant Amazon is cheapest option only on its top 20 bestsellers, with lower-selling books costing 14% more than price charged by rivals, study finds.
Sony has just launched a new ebook store in Germany today and it will allow customers to download thousands of books. One of the most exciting factors is that 2,000 of the books do not have DRM (Digital Rights Management) and will instead have digital watermarks. This will make it easier to transfer your purchases between your e-reader, smartphone, or tablet. The vast majority of English eBooks on the system will have DRM.
The New York Times has announced the launch of two publishing programs--New York Times short e-books co-published with the digital startup Byliner, and TimesFiles with Vook.In collaboration with Byliner, The Times will co-publish up to a dozen New York Times / Byliner Originals in the next year featuring narratives in areas in which The Times has reporting expertise including culture, sports, business, science and health. While sometimes growing out of related Times reporting, the titles will offer original content that is not available in the paper or on NYTimes.com. The Originals will range from 10,000 to 20,000 words in length and are designed to be read in one sitting.
Last week the Swedish media reported on a pilot project which sees Stockholm City library, Ordfront (one of the few mid-sized, independent publishing houses) and Publit (a technology company specialising in e-book and PoD publishing and distribution) join forces to trial a dual licensing model for e-books.‘Dual licensing’ is a term borrowed from the Open Source movement and describes how a product can both be sold for profit and shared freely under different sets of terms. The pilot applies the concept to e-books in the following way: libraries help digitise publishers’ backlist and get decent lending terms in return.
New York Times E-Book Best Sellers

A version of this list appears in the December 23, 2012 issue of The New York Times Book Review. Rankings reflect sales for the week ending December 8, 2012.

E-Book Fiction

1.     THREAT VECTOR, by Tom Clancy with Mark Greaney
2.     THE EDGE OF NEVER, by J.A. Redmerski
3.     PRIVATE LONDON, by James Patterson and Mark Pearson
4.     THE FORGOTTEN, by David Baldacci
5.     THE BLACK BOX, by Michael Connelly

E-Book Nonfiction

1.     PROOF OF HEAVEN, by Eben Alexander
2.     KILLING KENNEDY, by Bill O'Reilly and Martin Dugard
3.     KILLING LINCOLN, by Bill O'Reilly and Martin Dugard
4.     THOMAS JEFFERSON, by Jon Meacham
5.     DAMAGED, by Cathy Glass
           
Wall Street Journal E-Book Best Sellers (Week Ended Dec. 9)

Nonfiction E-Books
TITLE
AUTHOR / PUBLISHER
THIS WEEK
LAST
WEEK
Proof of Heaven
1
1
Eben Alexander/Simon & Schuster
Killing Kennedy
2
3
Bill O'Reilly, Martin Dugard/Henry Holt & Co.
Eat to Live
3
Joel Fuhrman/Little, Brown
Team of Rivals
4
2
Doris Kearns Goodwin/Simon & Schuster
Wheat Belly
5
William Davis/Rodale
Killing Lincoln
6
9
Bill O'Reilly, Martin Dugard/Henry Holt & Co.
The Ascent of George Washington
7
John Ferling/Bloomsbury USA
Damaged
8
6
Cathy Glass/HarperCollins
Thomas Jefferson: The Art of Power
9
7
Jon Meacham/Random House
Heads in Beds
10
Jacob Tomsky/Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group

Fiction E-Books
TITLE
AUTHOR / PUBLISHER
THIS WEEK
LAST
WEEK
Threat Vector
1
New
Tom Clancy with Mark Greaney/Penguin Group
The Edge of Never
2
6
J.A. Redmerski/J.A. Redmerski
Private London
3
New
James Patterson, Mark Pearson/Grand Central Publishing
The Forgotten
4
4
David Baldacci/Grand Central Publishing
The Black Box
5
1
Michael Connelly/Little, Brown
Wallbanger
6
Alice Clayton/Alice Clayton
Gone Girl
7
7
Gillian Flynn/Crown Publishing Group
A Leaf on the Wind of All Hallows
8
New
Diana Gabaldon/Random House
Merry Christmas, Alex Cross
9
9
James Patterson/Little, Brown
Notorious Nineteen
10
3
Janet Evanovich/Random House
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