30 de abril de 2012

Clubes de Leitura Bertrand do Fantástico - Maio


Clubes de Leitura do Fantástico

Lisboa
Orientação: Rogério Ribeiro.
Convidado: Maria do Rosário Monteiro, que falará sobre o livro A simbólica do espaço em «O senhor dos Anéis» de JRR Tolkien
Data: 4 de Maio de 2012, pelas 19h.
Obra em discussão: O Feiticeiro e a Sombra, de Ursula K. Le Guin.

Coimbra
Orientação: Cláudia Pinto.
Data: 31 de Maio de 2012, pelas 21h30.
Obra em discussão: Deuses Americanos, de Neil Gaiman.

Porto
Orientação: Rui Baptista.
Data: 26 de Maio de 2012, pelas 15h.
Obra em discussão: A Conspiração dos Antepassados, de David Soares.

Já nas bancas: LER, Maio 2012


29 de abril de 2012

Leituras Digitais (22 a 28 de Abril)



Rubrica semanal de notícias e artigos relacionados com a edição de livros digitais.

Earlier this year, Nielsen released a white paper on the relationship between metadata and book sales. Metadata was defined on different levels—basic and enhanced—so that the former included familiar elements such as title, publication date, and cover image; the latter included author biography, plot descriptions, and table of contents. "As the book industry takes its next step into the digital age, metadata will not only remain an essential part of the industry, but become increasingly important," the report concluded. Also of note: by including a cover image, sales go up 268 percent.
Editors of four of the most interesting and innovative digital publishers sat down with L.A. Times book critic David L. Ulin Saturday to discuss how they do what they do, and why.
I can hear the uproar as I write about agency pricing, but consider that many of the electronic items we buy are either agency priced or have the same effect through resale price maintenance agreements. Every ad I see for an Apple iPad gives the same price. Every ad I see for a Kindle Touch lists the same price. Yet no one complains that there is no price competition for these items (where is the DOJ’s proconsumer department in these cases?); the complaints are all directed at ebooks.

Of course, the answer is that Kindles don’t compete with Kindles, they compete with Nooks and each vendor independently decided to set the prices. But it is the blind person who fails to see that there is really no difference in effect for the consumer and the purpose of the antitrust laws, ultimately, is to protect competition for the benefit of consumers. Whereas the DOJ recognizes that the Kindle and the Nook are not the same, it insists that the Stephen King and the Dean Koontz novels are the same, at least in book form.
We are a small publisher, and our printing company (print and virtual) charges us for storage and/or bandwidth, and for the handling involved in the distribution of  even the virtual books.  Someone still has to process the order and payment for every piece sold.  When we add up the cost of production, plus the conversion fee, plus the virtual storage/bandwidth, plus handling of orders… our costs are almost the same as our print version.  In the end, we simply cannot afford to deeply discount an e pub version of our books to the level the consumer expects.  The simple- but entirely wrong- conviction on the part of the consumer that e books cost “nothing” to produce or sell is extremely damaging to the publishing world.  Two thirds of your article was spent reinforcing that widespread belief.  I am greatly disappointed that you did not take the opportunity to fully explain the math behind the pricing of e books when you have the consumer’s attention.
Tom Doherty Associates, publishers of Tor, Forge, Orb, Starscape, and Tor Teen, today announced that by early July 2012, their entire list of e-books will be available DRM-free.

“Our authors and readers have been asking for this for a long time,” said president and publisher Tom Doherty. “They’re a technically sophisticated bunch, and DRM is a constant annoyance to them. It prevents them from using legitimately-purchased e-books in perfectly legal ways, like moving them from one kind of e-reader to another.”
Coinciding with the London Book Fair, Click looks at the future of digital publishing in a special edition from the BBC's Council Chamber.
Is the digital age one to fear or be embraced by the publishing world?
Do electronic book reading devices sound the death knell for the physical book?
Does this brave new world democratise the world of books, leading to stunning new voices or a sea of talentless self-promoters?
And how will the reader find the desired author in the future?
In a live edition in front of an audience, Click's Gareth Mitchell and Bill Thompson are joined by a panel of experts, including Dan Franklin, the digital publisher at Random House in London, the e-book publisher, Rosemarie Hudson, founder of HopeRoad Publishing, and the poet and host of the Book Club Boutique, Salena Godden.
The most thunderous argument in Amazon's favour is that the market has spoken, and demands cheaper product. This one I find utterly bizarre. We know very well, in this post-crash age, that the market can be an idiot. The market wanted easy credit extended to all, low taxes and plenty of public spending. The end result was a financial catastrophe that has just plunged us into a double-dip recession and shows no sign of being played out. Sometimes, things cost more than we want. That is a truth we were encouraged to forget in the 90s, but it's one we're going to have to remember. Of course the market wants things to be cheaper. I want a Tesla electric sports car for a tenner, but I don't imagine that will happen either.
Traditional publishing is far from blameless. It has been slow and unimaginative. That is changing, at last, and the effect of the department of justice anti-trust action may ironically be to inspire a serious shift in how the big houses see the electronic marketplace. I hope so. Because if I'm going to get my magic ebook, we're going to need innovation, not locked-in stagnation.
For the ever-provocative Julian Gough, the fact that only 5% of literary fiction sales were electronic was evidence that "literary fiction has lost the next generation". "What is it that literary fiction does, that isn't done as well or better by other genres and newer artforms?" he asked.
Answers were many and varied. But as one of that literary ebook-buying 5%, I think Max Cairnduff hits the mark the closest with his one-word answer: "prose". Literary fiction can be about anything, so long as it's beautifully, intriguingly, surprisingly, gorgeously written, so long as it's brilliantly constructed – from the word, to the sentence, the paragraph, the chapter, the novel and beyond.
New York Times E-Book Best Sellers

A version of this list appears in the May 6, 2012 issue of The New York Times Book Review. Rankings reflect sales for the week ending April 21, 2012.

E-Book Fiction

1.                      FIFTY SHADES OF GREY, by E. L. James
2.                      FIFTY SHADES DARKER, by E. L. James
3.                      FIFTY SHADES FREED, by E. L. James
4.                      THE WITNESS, by Nora Roberts
5.                      THE INNOCENT, by David Baldacci

E-Book Nonfiction

1.                      LIFEBOAT NO. 8, by Elizabeth Kaye
2.                      LET’S PRETEND THIS NEVER HAPPENED, by Jenny Lawson
3.                      BEYOND OUTRAGE, by Robert B. Reich
4.                      THE PRESIDENTS CLUB, by Nancy Gibbs and Michael Duffy
5.                      MRS. KENNEDY AND ME, by Clint Hill with Lisa McCubbin

Wall Street Journal E-Book Best Sellers (Week Ended April 22)

Nonfiction E-Books
TITLE
AUTHOR / PUBLISHER
THIS WEEK
LAST
WEEK
Lifeboat No. 8
1
2
Elizabeth Kaye/Elizabeth Kaye
Let's Pretend This Never Happened
2
New
Jenny Lawson/Penguin Group
Through a Window
3
Jane Goodall/Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Beyond Outrage
4
New
Robert B. Reich/Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
The Presidents Club
5
New
Nancy Gibbs, Michael Duffy/Simon & Schuster
The Secret Piano
6
Zhu Xiao-Mei/AmazonCrossing
Mrs. Kennedy and Me
7
3
Clint Hill with Lisa McCubbin/Gallery Books
Act Like a Lady, Think Like a Man
8
Steve Harvey/HarperCollins
The Power of Habit
9
5
Charles Duhigg/Random House
Steve Jobs
10
7
Walter Isaacson/Simon & Schuster

Fiction E-Books
TITLE
AUTHOR / PUBLISHER
THIS WEEK
LAST
WEEK
Fifty Shades of Grey
1
1
E.L. James/The Writer's Coffee Shop Publishing House
Fifty Shade Darker
2
4
E.L. James/Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
Fifty Shades Freed
3
6
E.L. James/Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
Mockingjay
4
2
Suzanne Collins/Scholastic
Catching Fire
5
3
Suzanne Collins/Scholastic
The Witness
6
New
Nora Roberts/Penguin Group
The Innocent
7
New
David Baldacci/Grand Central Publishing
The Hunger Games
8
5
Suzanne Collins/Scholastic
The Lucky One
9
8
Nicholas Sparks/Grand Central Publishing
Unnatural Acts
10
New
Stuart Woods/Penguin Group

27 de abril de 2012

Vencedores dos Edgar Awards 2012


Mystery Writers of America is proud to announce the winners of the 2012 Edgar Allan Poe Awards, honoring the best in mystery fiction, non-fiction and television published or produced in 2011. The Edgar® Awards were presented to the winners at our 66th Gala Banquet, April 26, 2012 at the Grand Hyatt Hotel, New York City.

Best Novel
————–
  • The Ranger by Ace Atkins (Penguin Group USA - G.P. Putnam's Sons)
  • Gone by Mo Hayder (Grove/Atlantic - Atlantic Monthly Press)
  • The Devotion of Suspect X by Keigo Higashino (Minotaur Books)
  • 1222 by Anne Holt (Simon & Schuster - Scribner)
  • Field Gray by Philip Kerr (Penguin Group USA - G.P. Putnam's Sons - Marion Wood Books)
————–
Best First Novel
————–
  • Red on Red by Edward Conlon (Random House Publishing Group - Spiegel & Grau)
  • Last to Fold by David Duffy (Thomas Dunne Books)
  • All Cry Chaos by Leonard Rosen (The Permanent Press)
  • Bent Road by Lori Roy (Penguin Group USA - Dutton)
  • Purgatory Chasm by Steve Ulfelder (Minotaur Books - Thomas Dunne Books)
————–
Best Paperback Original
————–
  • The Company Man by Robert Jackson Bennett (Hachette Book Group - Orbit Books)
  • The Faces of Angels by Lucretia Grindle (Felony & Mayhem Press)
  • The Dog Sox by Russell Hill (Pleasure Boat Studio - Caravel Mystery Books)
  • Death of the Mantis by Michael Stanley (HarperCollins Publishers - Harper Paperbacks)
  • Vienna Twilight by Frank Tallis (Random House Trade Paperbacks)
————–
Best Fact Crime
————–
  • The Murder of the Century: The Gilded Age Crime That Scandalized a City and Sparked the Tabloid Wars by Paul Collins (Crown Publishing)
  • The Savage City: Race, Murder, and a Generation on the Edge by T.J. English (HarperCollins - William Morrow)
  • Destiny of the Republic: A Tale of Madness, Medicine and the Murder of a President by Candice Millard (Random House - Doubleday)
  • Girl, Wanted: The Chase for Sarah Pender by Steve Miller (Penguin Group USA - Berkley)
  • The Man in the Rockefeller Suit: The Astonishing Rise and Spectacular Fall of a Serial Imposter by Mark Seal (Penguin Group USA - Viking)
————–
Best Critical Biographical
————–
  • The Tattooed Girl: The Enigma of Stieg Larsson and the Secrets Behind the Most Compelling Thrillers of our Time by Dan Burstein, Arne de Keijzer & John-Henri Holmberg (St. Martin's Griffin)
  • Agatha Christie: Murder in the Making by John Curran (HarperCollins)
  • On Conan Doyle: Or, the Whole Art of Storytelling by Michael Dirda (Princeton University Press)
  • Detecting Women: Gender and the Hollywood Detective Film by Philippa Gates (SUNY Press)
  • Scripting Hitchcock: Psycho, The Birds and Marnie by Walter Raubicheck and Walter Srebnick (University of Illinois Press)
————–
Best Short Story
————–
  • "Marley's Revolution" - Alfred Hitchcock Mystery Magazine by John C. Boland (Dell Magazines)
  • "Tomorrow's Dead" - Ellery Queen Mystery Magazine by David Dean (Dell Magazines)
  • "The Adakian Eagle" - Down These Strange Streets by Bradley Denton (Penguin Group USA - Ace Books)
  • "Lord John and the Plague of Zombies" - Down These Strange Streets by Diana Gabaldon (Penguin Group USA - Ace Books)
  • "The Case of Death and Honey" - A Study in Sherlock by Neil Gaiman (Random House Publishing Group - Bantam Books)
  • "The Man Who Took His Hat Off to the Driver of the Train" - Ellery Queen Mystery Magazine by Peter Turnbull (Dell Magazines)
————–
Best Juvenile
————–
  • Horton Halfpott by Tom Angleberger (Abrams - Amulet Books)
  • It Happened on a Train by Mac Barnett (Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers)
  • Vanished by Sheela Chari (Disney Book Group - Disney Hyperion)
  • Icefall by Matthew J. Kirby (Scholastic Press)
  • The Wizard of Dark Street by Shawn Thomas Odyssey (Egmont USA)
————–
Young Adult
————–
  • Shelter by Harlan Coben (Penguin Young Readers Group - G.P. Putnam's Sons)
  • The Name of the Star by Maureen Johnson (Penguin Young Readers Group - G.P. Putnam's Sons)
  • The Silence of Murder by Dandi Daley Mackall (Random House Children's Books - Knopf BFYR)
  • The Girl is Murder by Kathryn Miller Haines (Macmillan Children's Publishing Group - Roaring Creek Press)
  • Kill You Last by Todd Strasser (Egmont USA)

25 de abril de 2012

Simpósio sobre Bram Stoker


Originado pelo projecto Open Graves, Open Minds e inserido nas comemorações do centenário da morte de Bram Stoker, o simpósio realizou-se nos passados dias 20 e 21 de Abril, na Universidade de Hertfordshire. Nos vídeos abaixo podem ser visualizados alguns extractos do evento:


24 de abril de 2012

Colóquio Internacional «Tinha Paixão? - Literaturas Brasileira e Africana»



O evento Tinha Paixão? - Literaturas Brasileira e Africana, um colóquio anual exclusivamente dedicado às literaturas brasileira e africana, tem como objectivo oferecer a um público ilimitado a oportunidade de conhecer ou reencontrar alguns dos mais marcantes autores do último século. É pedido a cada um dos nossos conferencistas que fale da sua paixão literária e que a partilhe com os outros.

As comunicações e leituras dos nossos convidados caracterizam-se por acolherem e quererem ser acolhidas por qualquer ouvinte, novo ou velho, discente ou docente, leitor ávido ou nulo. Todos são bem-vindos e qualquer um é livre para participar e enriquecer a conversa. Tal é possível porque decidimos tratar um tema universal, e,  para que ele seja abordado, os nossos participantes falam todos a mesma língua: a dos apaixonados.

PROGRAMA | 2ª EDIÇÃO

SESSÃO EXTRA:
26 ABRIL – Quinta-feira | Anfiteatro Nobre
Faculdade de Letras da Universidade do Porto
20h45: Café
21h00: Apresentação de Joana Matos Frias
21h30: Sessão de cinema

Ilha das Flores (1989), de Jorge Furtado
Mutum (2007), de Sandra Kogut

SESSÃO DE ABERTURA:
30 ABRIL - Segunda-feira | Galeria de Paris (2º andar)
18h30:
Arnaldo Saraiva – João Cabral de Melo Neto
Sunamita Cohen – Noémia de Sousa

Leitura de vários autores
Mafalda Sofia Gomes e José Pestana

Leitura de João Cabral de Melo Neto
Rui Pena

7 MAIO - Segunda-feira | Livraria Leitura Books & Living
18h30:
Celina Silva – Manuel Rui
Leonor Figueiredo – Vinicius de Moraes

Leitura de Vinicius de Moraes
Rui de Noronha Ozório

14 MAIO - Segunda-feira | Maus Hábitos
18h30:
Ana T. Rocha – Conceição Lima
Pires Laranjeira - João-Maria Vilanova
Vanessa Rodrigues - Andrea del Fuego


21 MAIO - Segunda-feira | Gallery Hostel
18h30:
Gustavo Rubim – Carlos Drummond de Andrade
Isabel Galhano – “A dolorosa raiz do Micondó”

Leitura de Carlos Drummond de Andrade
Carolina Marcello

SESSÃO DE ENCERRAMENTO:
28 MAIO - Segunda-feira | Breyner 85
18h30:
Isabel Pires de Lima – José Eduardo Agualusa
Patrícia Lino – Manoel de Barros

Leitura de Manoel de Barros
Nuno Meireles

Venda e Exposição de livros
Livraria Poetria

Finalistas dos Shirley Jackson Awards 2011


In recognition of the legacy of Shirley Jackson’s writing, and with permission of the author’s estate, The Shirley Jackson Awards, Inc. has been established for outstanding achievement in the literature of psychological suspense, horror, and the dark fantastic.
The Shirley Jackson Awards are voted upon by a jury of professional writers, editors, critics, and academics, with input from a Board of Advisors.  The awards are given for the best work published in the preceding calendar year in the following categories:  Novel, Novella, Novelette, Short Story, Single-Author Collection, and Edited Anthology.
The nominees for the 2011 Shirley Jackson Awards are:

Novel
————–
  • The Devil All the Time, Donald Ray Pollock (Doubleday)
  • The Dracula Papers, Reggie Oliver (Chômu Press)
  • The Great Lover, Michael Cisco (Chômu Press)
  • Knock Knock, S. P. Miskowski (Omnium Gatherum Media)
  • The Last Werewolf, Glen Duncan (Canongate Books, Ltd.)
  • Witches on the Road Tonight, Sheri Holman (Grove Press)
————–
Novella
————–
  • And the Dead Shall Outnumber the Living,” Deborah Biancotti (Ishtar, Gilgamesh Press)
  • A Child’s Problem,” Reggie Oliver (A Book of Horrors, Jo Fletcher Books)
  • Displacement,” Michael Marano (Stories from the Plague Years, Cemetery Dance Publications)
  • The Men Upstairs, Tim Waggoner (Delirium Books)
  • Near Zennor,” Elizabeth Hand (A Book of Horrors, Jo Fletcher Books)
  • Rose Street Attractors,” Lucius Shepard (Ghosts by Gaslight, Harper Voyager)
————–
Novelette
————–
  • The Ballad of Ballard and Sandrine,” Peter Straub (Conjunctions 56)
  • Ditch Witch,” Lucius Shepard (Supernatural Noir, Dark Horse)
  • The Last Triangle,” Jeffrey Ford (Supernatural Noir, Dark Horse)
  • Omphalos,” Livia Llewellyn (Engines of Desire: Tales of Love & Other Horrors, Lethe Press)
  • The Summer People,” Kelly Link (Tin House 49/Steampunk! An Anthology of Fantastically Rich and Strange Stories, Candlewick Press)
————–
Short Fiction
————–
  • Absolute Zero,” Nadia Bulkin (Creatures: Thirty Years of Monsters, Prime Books)
  • The Corpse Painter’s Masterpiece,” M. Rickert (The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Sept/Oct, 2011)
  • Hair,” Joan Aiken (The Monkey’s Wedding and Other Stories, Small Beer Press/ The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, July/Aug, 2011)
  • Max,” Jason Ockert (The Iowa Review 41/1)
  • Sunbleached,” Nathan Ballingrud (Teeth, HarperCollins)
  • Things to Know About Being Dead,” Genevieve Valentine (Teeth, HarperCollins)
————–
Single-Author Collection
————–
  • After the Apocalypse: Stories, Maureen F. McHugh (Small Beer Press)
  • The Corn Maiden and Other Nightmares, Joyce Carol Oates (Mysterious Press)
  • Engines of Desire: Tales of Love & Other Horrors, Livia Llewellyn (Lethe Press)
  • The Janus Tree, Glen Hirshberg (Subterranean Press)
  • Red Gloves, Christopher Fowler (PS Publishing)
  • What Wolves Know, Kit Reed (PS Publishing)
————–
Edited Anthology
————–
  • Blood and Other Cravings, edited by Ellen Datlow (Tor)
  • A Book of Horrors, edited by Stephen Jones (Jo Fletcher Books)
  • Ghosts by Gaslight, edited by Jack Dann and Nick Gevers (Harper Voyager)
  • Supernatural Noir, edited by Ellen Datlow (Dark Horse)
  • Teeth, edited by Ellen Datlow and Terri Windling (HarperCollins)
  • The Thackery T. Lambshead Cabinet of Curiosities, edited by Ann and Jeff VanderMeer (Harper Voyager)
Os vencedores serão anunciados na Readercon 23, que se realiza em Massachussetts, entre 12 e 15 de Julho.

23 de abril de 2012

Fundação José Saramago lança revista literária



A Fundação José Saramago acaba de disponibilizar o primeiro número da revista literária Lucerna. A publicação - gratuita e em formato digital -, terá uma periodicidade mensal, podendo ser descarregada na App Store da Apple ou na página da Fundação.
Lucerna, dizem os dicionários, é “uma janela alta que serve para ventilar e dar luz a um quarto”. É também sinónimo de claraboia, palavra escolhida por José Saramago no começo da sua vida literária para intitular um romance e para, talvez, concretizar uma declaração de intenções daquilo que queria que fosse o seu trabalho de escritor: olhar através de uma janela discreta o que se passa no mundo ou nas almas, observar com atenção ativa e respeitosa, contar o que tinha visto, refletir sobre os movimentos que são o viver. É o que se pretende modestamente com Lucerna.
Desde a origem da Fundação José Saramago que se viu a necessidade de uma revista que recolhesse textos e indicações dos seus colaboradores literários, que são muitos no mundo, vinculados tanto a universidades como às diferentes literaturas nacionais. Em alguns casos serão ensaios sobre a obra de José Saramago, embora Lucerna não nasça para o estudo da obra do Patrono da Fundação, mas para indagar sobre o que se está fazendo e para recuperar autores e livros-chave que não devemos nunca perder de vista porque são património de todos. Também em Lucerna, que terá uma periodicidade mensal, se procurará estimular a leitura nos diversos suportes já que, assumindo o lado bem-humorado de José Saramago, “Ler faz bem à saúde”.

O que é ler? (III)


Para assinalar o Dia Mundial do Livro, revelamos o último capítulo da trilogia de testemunhos inéditos gravados durante as Correntes d'Escritas. Eduardo Sacheri, Inês Pedrosa, Margarida Vale de Gato, Helena Vasconcelos, Manuel Jorge Marmelo, Miguel Miranda e Onésimo Teotónio Almeida responderam ao desafio em ano de 25º aniversário da LER.

22 de abril de 2012

Leituras Digitais (15 a 21 de Abril)



Rubrica semanal de notícias e artigos relacionados com a edição de livros digitais.

The bottom line is that an ebook is less valuable than a pbook. It is less valuable because it cannot be collected; it cannot provide the visual gratification that a physical library, like a piece of art, can; it is licensed rather than owned; and, most importantly, it has no ability to increase in value over time if properly cared for and curated because it has no rarity. The ebook versions of the Hunger Games Trilogy will never have an intrinsic collectible value of $50, let alone of $3,000. There will never be a scarcity of the ebooks.
Will today’s existing conglomerates continue to dominate the future of publishing? Or, will technology enable a rising tide of upstarts and independents that will forever change the publishing landscape? That was the question at the heart of the London Book Fair’s Second Annual Great Debate, which put forth the following resolution: In the fight for survival, outsiders and startups are taking on today’s heavyweights and will ultimately deliver a knockout punch.
The store offers over 100 thousand titles with prices ranging from £1 to £13. You can also find periodicals there. Newspapers including The Guardian, The Daily Mail, and The Observer can be bought on the site by the issue. You can also get the newspapers via a monthly subscription.
There is also no reason to think that the agency model will lead to higher consumer prices once the e-book market matures. Indeed, unlike the physical book market—which entails significant variable costs associated with printing, inventorying, and distributing books—these costs are rather negligible for e-books. Moreover, the demand for e-books is relatively elastic, meaning that as the price of e-books declines, consumers are likely to buy more books. This combination of low variable costs and elastic demand suggests that lowering consumer prices to the point that makes e-books financially viable for both publishers and distributors might be in their long-run best interests. So far, there is no reason to think that this cannot occur under the agency pricing model as long as the distribution market for e-books remains competitive.
The settlement agreement says that publishers cannot prevent a retailer from discounting the publishers ebooks except that it can require the retailer to make a profit across the publisher’s line. I find that an interesting proviso. Consider how secretive Amazon has been about how many ebooks it really has been selling. Amazon has only been forthcoming with broad numbers and in a few cases announcing that an author has joined the millions club. Will Amazon, who is not a party to the proceedings, voluntarily share sales information? I doubt it.
Yet the sharing of that information is necessary to make the exception meaningful. If the wholesale price, that is, the price the ebooksellers have to pay the publisher, of the new James Patterson ebook novel is $13 and Amazon sells it for $10 and sells 1 million ebook copies for a $3 million loss, somehow Amazon must sell enough other books in that publisher’s line to overcome the loss. How is that going to work?
What we don't need is more shouting and finger-pointing, nor more assumptions that there's one "right" model for all e-book sales. Textbooks are expensive. Tight DRM might make more sense for them than for consumer entertainment novels, especially when the target for those novels will probably find it easier to just buy a copy rather than hunt down an edition on the Web somewhere.
In the end, if the Department of Justice is going to come down on publishers for anything, I'd hope that it finds a way to do it over locking us into platforms. Taking away our book rights is a pricing issue too.
Amazon is a catalog, not a bookstore. Booksellers provide services to you that few appreciate, at least to the point of financially supporting us. Amazon also makes use of our services, in that we’re helping their customers, too; it’s our job to sell books even if we can’t bank the sale.
Imagine the bookstore with no sales staff, just cashiers. That’s the future we’re already heading towards as more bookstores are forced to hire fewer booksellers — or even to let a few go.
Imagine your hometown or neighborhood without a bookstore. Some of you don’t have to imagine, as one major chain has already closed.
There are solutions. One can even compete with Amazon. But the new bookstore will likely look a bit different than anyone is used to.
New York Times E-Book Best Sellers

A version of this list appears in the April 29, 2012 issue of The New York Times Book Review. Rankings reflect sales for the week ending April 14, 2012.

E-Book Fiction

1.                      FIFTY SHADES OF GREY, by E. L. James
2.                      FIFTY SHADES DARKER, by E. L. James
3.                      FIFTY SHADES FREED, by E. L. James
4.                      CALICO JOE, by John Grisham
5.                      THE LUCKY ONE, by Nicholas Sparks

E-Book Nonfiction

1.                      A NIGHT TO REMEMBER, by Walter Lord
2.                      LIFEBOAT NO. 8, by Elizabeth Kaye
3.                      MRS. KENNEDY AND ME, by Clint Hill with Lisa McCubbin
4.                      DROP DEAD HEALTHY, by A. J. Jacobs
5.                      HEAVEN IS FOR REAL, by Todd Burpo with Lynn Vincent

Wall Street Journal E-Book Best Sellers (Week Ended April 15)

Nonfiction E-Books
TITLE
AUTHOR / PUBLISHER
THIS WEEK
LAST
WEEK
A Night to Remember
1
Walter Lord/Open Road
Lifeboat No. 8
2
4
Elizabeth Kaye/Elizabeth Kaye
Mrs. Kennedy and Me
3
1
Clint Hill with Lisa McCubbin/Gallery Books
Heaven Is For Real
4
9
Todd Burpo with Lynn Vincent/Thomas Nelson Publishers
The Power of Habit
5
6
Charles Duhigg/Random House
Drop Dead Healthy
6
New
A.J. Jacobs/Simon & Schuster
Steve Jobs
7
5
Walter Isaacson/Simon & Schuster
The Food Revolution
8
John Robbins/Red Wheel/Weiser
Escape From Camp 14
9
7
Blaine Harden/Penguin Group
The Big Miss
10
3
Hank Haney/Crown Publishing Group

Fiction E-Books
TITLE
AUTHOR / PUBLISHER
THIS WEEK
LAST
WEEK
Fifty Shades of Grey
1
2
E.L. James/The Writer's Coffee Shop Publishing House
Mockingjay
2
3
Suzanne Collins/Scholastic
Catching Fire
3
1
Suzanne Collins/Scholastic
Fifty Shades Darker
4
5
E.L. James/Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
The Hunger Games
5
4
Suzanne Collins/Scholastic
Fifty Shades Freed
6
6
E.L. James/Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
Calico Joe
7
New
John Grisham/Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
The Lucky One
8
7
Nicholas Sparks/Grand Central Publishing
Guilty Wives
9
8
James Patterson, David Ellis/Little, Brown
On the Island
10
10
Tracey Garvis Graves/Tracey Garvis Graves

Vídeos

OverDrive CEO Steve Potash on Digital Library Lending

Why the Social Game Industry Needs Writers
Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...