16 de dezembro de 2012

Leituras Digitais (9 a 15 de Dezembro)



Rubrica semanal de notícias e artigos relacionados com a edição de livros digitais.

eBooks are both a blessing and a curse as regards promotion of literacy. That anyone who has access to a keyboard can suddenly become an author is a curse; that readers pick up and read a lot of the produced drivel is a curse; that these same readers and authors do not recognize the difference between, for example, your and you’re is a curse; that readers are more interested in being distracted from reading than from actually reading is a curse.On the other hand, ebooks make material to read more accessible to more people at a lower cost, definitely a blessing. In addition, because ereaders offer such things as instant dictionary access and online access to websites like Wikipedia where more information is available about a topic, ebooks can be viewed as spreaders of knowledge, which is also a blessing.
Want to lend a copy of a book you love to your friend, but you only bought the eBook? Check out Ownshelf, a new service that will let you share ePUB titles with your friends across devices. The tool, which is currently in beta, lets you show friends your digital book shelves and look at your friends’ bookshelves, and borrow and loan titles from these digital bookshelves.
In the past few months, we’ve seen Amazon, Barnes & Noble and others discount HarperCollins ebooks. Now, they are discounting Hachette and Simon & Schuster ebooks, too. Mostly, Amazon has lowered its prices and other retailers have quickly moved to copy the Amazon price. As a result, the average price of a top-25 ebook best-seller is at its lowest point since Digital Book World started measuring it this summer: $9.06. But it’s doubtful this situation will last long.I think we’re going to see a much more diverse ebook pricing marketplace, with retailers angling to eke out advantages against each other whenever possible.
Lately, however, the fog of uncertainty has begun to lift. Ebooks may, or may not, inadvertently sponsor hardback sales (as ebook browsers opt for a more lasting and tangible experience). There is, however, no doubt that ebooks, which are decimating paperback sales, have now become the established, contemporary mass market for books. Meanwhile, the hardback remains the elite format.
As you could probably guess from E-ink’s quarterly statements, this has not been a banner year for ereaders. The screen tech company has reported a marked drop in income, indicating that fewer ereaders were being made this year than last.And if iSuppli’s projections prove true, next year’s ereader market is going to look even worse.This market research firm has released a new set of projections today that predict that there will be a 27% decline next year. They’re projecting that only about 15 million ereaders will be shipped this calendar year, down by over a third from last year’s peak of 23.2 million units. Next year’s shipments are projected to total around 11 million units.
This column is the first in a two-part series about libraries and their role in the marketing and readership of books.  This first part addresses the present conflict.  The second part will look forward to the future for libraries and publishers and the important challenges that they must address.
Online retail giant Amazon is cheapest option only on its top 20 bestsellers, with lower-selling books costing 14% more than price charged by rivals, study finds.
Sony has just launched a new ebook store in Germany today and it will allow customers to download thousands of books. One of the most exciting factors is that 2,000 of the books do not have DRM (Digital Rights Management) and will instead have digital watermarks. This will make it easier to transfer your purchases between your e-reader, smartphone, or tablet. The vast majority of English eBooks on the system will have DRM.
The New York Times has announced the launch of two publishing programs--New York Times short e-books co-published with the digital startup Byliner, and TimesFiles with Vook.In collaboration with Byliner, The Times will co-publish up to a dozen New York Times / Byliner Originals in the next year featuring narratives in areas in which The Times has reporting expertise including culture, sports, business, science and health. While sometimes growing out of related Times reporting, the titles will offer original content that is not available in the paper or on NYTimes.com. The Originals will range from 10,000 to 20,000 words in length and are designed to be read in one sitting.
Last week the Swedish media reported on a pilot project which sees Stockholm City library, Ordfront (one of the few mid-sized, independent publishing houses) and Publit (a technology company specialising in e-book and PoD publishing and distribution) join forces to trial a dual licensing model for e-books.‘Dual licensing’ is a term borrowed from the Open Source movement and describes how a product can both be sold for profit and shared freely under different sets of terms. The pilot applies the concept to e-books in the following way: libraries help digitise publishers’ backlist and get decent lending terms in return.
New York Times E-Book Best Sellers

A version of this list appears in the December 23, 2012 issue of The New York Times Book Review. Rankings reflect sales for the week ending December 8, 2012.

E-Book Fiction

1.     THREAT VECTOR, by Tom Clancy with Mark Greaney
2.     THE EDGE OF NEVER, by J.A. Redmerski
3.     PRIVATE LONDON, by James Patterson and Mark Pearson
4.     THE FORGOTTEN, by David Baldacci
5.     THE BLACK BOX, by Michael Connelly

E-Book Nonfiction

1.     PROOF OF HEAVEN, by Eben Alexander
2.     KILLING KENNEDY, by Bill O'Reilly and Martin Dugard
3.     KILLING LINCOLN, by Bill O'Reilly and Martin Dugard
4.     THOMAS JEFFERSON, by Jon Meacham
5.     DAMAGED, by Cathy Glass
           
Wall Street Journal E-Book Best Sellers (Week Ended Dec. 9)

Nonfiction E-Books
TITLE
AUTHOR / PUBLISHER
THIS WEEK
LAST
WEEK
Proof of Heaven
1
1
Eben Alexander/Simon & Schuster
Killing Kennedy
2
3
Bill O'Reilly, Martin Dugard/Henry Holt & Co.
Eat to Live
3
Joel Fuhrman/Little, Brown
Team of Rivals
4
2
Doris Kearns Goodwin/Simon & Schuster
Wheat Belly
5
William Davis/Rodale
Killing Lincoln
6
9
Bill O'Reilly, Martin Dugard/Henry Holt & Co.
The Ascent of George Washington
7
John Ferling/Bloomsbury USA
Damaged
8
6
Cathy Glass/HarperCollins
Thomas Jefferson: The Art of Power
9
7
Jon Meacham/Random House
Heads in Beds
10
Jacob Tomsky/Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group

Fiction E-Books
TITLE
AUTHOR / PUBLISHER
THIS WEEK
LAST
WEEK
Threat Vector
1
New
Tom Clancy with Mark Greaney/Penguin Group
The Edge of Never
2
6
J.A. Redmerski/J.A. Redmerski
Private London
3
New
James Patterson, Mark Pearson/Grand Central Publishing
The Forgotten
4
4
David Baldacci/Grand Central Publishing
The Black Box
5
1
Michael Connelly/Little, Brown
Wallbanger
6
Alice Clayton/Alice Clayton
Gone Girl
7
7
Gillian Flynn/Crown Publishing Group
A Leaf on the Wind of All Hallows
8
New
Diana Gabaldon/Random House
Merry Christmas, Alex Cross
9
9
James Patterson/Little, Brown
Notorious Nineteen
10
3
Janet Evanovich/Random House

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