30 de dezembro de 2012

Leituras Digitais (23 a 29 de Dezembro)



Rubrica semanal de notícias e artigos relacionados com a edição de livros digitais.

The number of high street bookshops in Britain has more than halved in just seven years due to the rise of e-books and the consumer downturn, research for The Daily Telegraph has found.
The percentage of adult Americans who read a book this fall fell to 75% from 78% a year ago, according to new survey findings by the Pew Research Center released December 27. The survey of Americans age 16 and older found that 23% of people in the age bracket read e-books in the previous 12 months, up from 16% a year ago, while the percentage who read print books fell to 67% from 72%.

The survey, from the Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project, was conducted from October 15-November 10 among 2,252 Americans 16 and up. The increase in e-book reading was fueled by higher ownership of digital reading devices, with the survey finding that 33% of Americans 16 and up had either a dedicated e-reader or a tablet, up from 18% in late 2011.
But you’re an Ars reader, and you actually know (and care!) what DRM stands for. After all, we’ve been covering digital rights management for years, ever since it was a contentious issue in the music industry. You may recall that Amazon itself led the charge against Cupertino, challenging iTunes with cheaper downloads and a lack of DRM. But Amazon's lead in the fight against music DRM was a business decision rather than an ideological stance. You may remember our story from late October 2012, detailing how to strip DRM off of Amazon Kindle purchases as a means of backing up your titles and preventing Amazon from deleting your entire library on a whim.

And that leaves this question: where’s the DRM outrage over e-books? Or put another way, why doesn’t Amazon care about eliminating DRM for books, when it did for music?
The top six best-selling ebooks of 2012 are all part of the Fifty Shades and Hunger Games trilogies. One interesting thing about these two trilogies as top sellers is that one is all about sex and discretely for adults and the other awkwardly avoids mentions of sex and was directed toward a younger audience.

At the same time, they are connected in that the ability to buy them through their reading devices and read them privately helped propel their success. Would Fifty Shades been nearly as popular if readers had to enter bookstores to buy the books and display that they were reading them every time they did? Would Hunger Games have been as popular if readers had to visit the children’s section of a bookstore to buy them?

We’ll never know. But, undoubtedly, the rise of e-reading helped drive each of these titles to incredible sales.
Books are changing. Media is changing. The way we read is changing. In order for those things to happen we need to abandon tools that replicate the old and embrace new devices. Ereaders made a fine halfway point between reading on a tablet and reading a paper-based book. In fact, they rejuvenated book sales by allowing impulse payments for the first time. But even if you think the future of the book will be dominated by text, their time has now passed.
Self-publishing has been propelled by print on demand technologies that have made it possible to produce books to order and thus control the investment in book inventory.  But many authors have discovered to their dismay that distribution, publicity and marketing can still be an expensive proposition.
Amazon Prime for eBooks was released in November 2011, around the same time most of the lending websites started experiencing problems. Amazon allows people who pay the $70 annual fee to have access to one free eBook a month. Authors actually make money when people borrow their books for free via Amazon, and make nothing when their book is shared between friends on book lending websites. This obviously is in an authors best interest to promote the fact their book is on Prime, because in many cases, lending your book out for free makes you more money then selling it for .99.

The one problem with most eBook lending websites is that there is only a few copies of the most popular books, at any given time. The entire lending system was developed so that once a book was loaned out once, it can never be lent out again. Many users are obviously gravitating towards Amazon Prime and the book lending sites are not seeing enough new blood being added to make up for all the best books expiring off their system. Prime books are basically infinite, and millions of users can borrow the same book if they wanted to.
Traditional print book covers draw many parallels with billboards and conventional marketing to appeal to casual readers. When you walk into a bookstore and there are thousands of books present, they start to all blur together. Bright colorful images and racy cover art are increasingly becoming more bold to grab people’s attention and hopefully prompt an impulse buy. When indie authors self-publish and release digital firsts, how important is cover art? Weighing in on the issue are some of  the top digital publishing companies and best selling authors.
For the most part, the magazine industry has perceived digital publishing as a great unknown, unsure of whether the upheaval to their familiar way of life will be worth the effort, expense and re-engineering of their decades-old processes. While some have clung to the tired notion that digital is a threat and that they must figure out how to compete against it to remain relevant, most recognize there is tremendous opportunity--but also that they are ill-prepared to capitalize on it.

The digital discussion often results in more questions than answers: will we make more money going digital? How will going digital affect the business in the long run? What kind of impact will we see in circulation or advertising by going digital?
New York Times E-Book Best Sellers

A version of this list appears in the January 6, 2013 issue of The New York Times Book Review. Rankings reflect sales for the week ending December 22, 2012.

E-Book Fiction

1.     GONE GIRL, by Gillian Flynn
2.     THE FORGOTTEN, by David Baldacci
3.     SAFE HAVEN, by Nicholas Sparks
4.     THE COINCIDENCE OF CALLIE AND KAYDEN, by Jessica Sorensen
5.     MERRY CHRISTMAS, ALEX CROSS, by James Patterson

E-Book Nonfiction

1.     PROOF OF HEAVEN, by Eben Alexander
2.     THE END OF THE LINE, by Glenn Thrush and Jonathan Martin
3.     KILLING KENNEDY, by Bill O'Reilly and Martin Dugard
4.     OUTLAW PLATOON, by Sean Parnell with John R. Bruning
5.     NO EASY DAY, by Mark Owen with Kevin Maurer
           
Wall Street Journal E-Book Best Sellers (Week Ended Dec. 23)

Nonfiction E-Books
TITLE
AUTHOR / PUBLISHER
THIS WEEK
LAST
WEEK
Proof of Heaven
1
1
Eben Alexander/Simon & Schuster
The End of the Line
2
new
Glenn Thrush, Jonathan Martin/Random House
Killing Kennedy
3
2
Bill O'Reilly, Martin Dugard/Henry Holt & Co.
Always Looking Up
4
--
Michael J. Fox/Hyperion
Outlaw Platoon
5
--
Sean Parnell with John Bruning/HarperCollins
No Easy Day
6
7
Mark Owen with Kevin Maurer/Penguin Group
Killing Lincoln
7
3
Bill O'Reilly, Martin Dugard/Henry Holt & Co.
Team of Rivals
8
4
Doris Kearns Goodwin/Simon & Schuster
Thomas Jefferson
9
5
Jon Meacham/Random House
Behind the Beautiful Forevers
10
--
Katherine Boo/Random House

Fiction E-Books
TITLE
AUTHOR / PUBLISHER
THIS WEEK
LAST
WEEK
The Hobbit
1
4
J.R.R. Tolkien/Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Gone Girl
2
5
Gillian Flynn/Crown Publishing Group
The Forgotten
3
3
David Baldacci/Grand Central Publishing
The Coincidence of Callie and Kayden
4
new
Jessica Sorensen/Jessica Sorensen
Safe Haven
5
new
Nicholas Sparks/Grand Central Publishing
Merry Christmas, Alex Cross
6
8
James Patterson/Little, Brown
Fallen Too Far
7
new
Abbi Glines/Abbi Glines
The Racketeer
8
9
John Grisham/Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
11/22/63
9
--
Stephen King/Gallery Books
Fifty Shades of Grey
10
--
E.L. James/Vintage Books

Sem comentários:

Enviar um comentário

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...