17 de junho de 2012

Leituras Digitais (10 a 16 de Junho)



Rubrica semanal de notícias e artigos relacionados com a edição de livros digitais.

When e-textbooks were first introduced, they were supposed to be the wave of the future, and experts thought we’d see e-reader-toting students littering college campuses, and of course being adopted in droves by online university students. But they haven’t taken off quite as expected: according to market research firm Student Monitor, only about 11% of college students have bought e-textbooks. So what happened? Here, we’ll explore several reasons why students aren’t yet warming up to the idea of e-textbooks today.
As the CEO of Smashwords, a 14-person company in Los Gatos, Calif., Coker gives authors free self-publishing software that converts Word documents into ­
e-book files—and lets them set the price. Through ­distribution partnerships those e-books line the shelves of digital bookstores run by Apple, Barnes & Noble, Sony and Kobo. No deal yet with Amazon.
When it comes to books you could say that we’re living in a paradox of choice. Yes, books are cheaper and more readily available than ever,; but libraries are being closed and serious thinking is being crowded out by excessive materialism. I wouldn’t be where I am today without the protected calm space of a well-tended local library. Libraries are the universities of the masses and we lose them at our peril.
New data from Pricewaterhouse Coopers’ Global Entertainment and Media Outlook projects that e-books will make up 50 percent of the U.S. trade book market by 2016. What will happen in the rest of the world during that time? PwC gave paidContent an exclusive look at their e-book data, and here are some of their predictions.
Recently, a study suggested that enhanced ebooks, which allow kids to interact with stories by swiping or tapping text, may be detrimental to developing literacy and memory. The children in the study sample apparently found it harder to recall plot details from enhanced ebooks, focusing more on the demands of the device they were using than the story they read. Drawing an ancient, creaky, anecdotal parallel with my own experience, this makes some sense to me. I recall almost no plot detail from the Famous Five game books I once played, only the physical sensations of handling dice, compass-wheels, picnic boxes, maps. What they developed was muscle memory, rather than mental.
Net sales revenue from eBooks have surpassed hardcover books in the first quarter of 2012.
According to the March Association of American Publishers (AAP) net sales revenue report (collecting data from 1,189 publishers), adult eBook sales were $282.3 million while adult hardcover sales counted $229.6 million during the first quarter of 2012. During the same period last year, hardcover accounted for $335 million in sales while eBooks logged $220.4 million.
But to a large extent, it really is the best of times for publishing. We have a lot of potential to connect more people with more ideas more efficiently and quickly than ever before. We have more people reading and writing than ever before, though (like publishing) literacy skies are also in a permanent downward trajectory according to generations of chickens little.
There are challenges, particularly as patterns of distribution are disrupted and new ones emerge. New possibilities carry costs and many are inevitably going to be failures. Integrating new options into the way people discover, use, and contribute to the record of scholarship can be exhausting, and someone who hears about a new novel may have trouble getting it because it’s not available through their library, their favorite bookstore can’t carry it, it’s in the wrong ebook format, or it’s only available to people living in a different geographic region, which seems insane since their Facebook friends who are raving about it have no trouble expressing themselves from a different continent. There are more choices, but they come with new and perplexing limits, and the whole thing is changing so fast it’s wearing.
I’m worried about the manipulation of us all through technology and I worry that we’re handing over power to companies that don’t necessarily have writers and readers at their heart. It’s about code and format, not about why we might read War and Peace or Mort d’Arthur. Yes, there are many changes in technology, but I don’t believe the human heart changes. The idea that we all have to engage in the same way now is erroneous.
First, Alan now has current info on the costs of the EBM and how it’s generating money. It turns out his older info was heavily pessimistic; the device is more profitable than he calculated. According to OnDemand Books, most bookstores with an EBM use it to create between 7 thousand and 14 thousand books a year. Based on current cost estimates, that’s enough income to pay off the investment in one to two years. This makes it a far better investment than before.
But there’s a catch. It turns out that the booksellers aren’t using the EBMs to print books from the OnDemand Books catalog (HarperCollins, Lightning Source, Google Books); no, most are operating the device as a mini print shop. It looks like 90% or so the books printed the first year come from walk-ins – local folks who bring their own file and want a few copies of their own book.
In Worldreader's first test, funded by the U.S. Agency for International Development at six schools in Ghana starting in 2010, the group found that primary-school students who got Kindles increased their performance on standardized reading tests from about 13% to 16%.
For kids who develop a love for reading, there is another benefit that is hard to quantify: a seemingly endless library. "I can access every book I want to read very quickly," says Eperence Uwera, a 13-year-old Rwandan refugee at the Humble School. "I would love to go [home] with the Kindle during the holidays."
New York Times E-Book Best Sellers

A version of this list appears in the June 24, 2012 issue of The New York Times Book Review. Rankings reflect sales for the week ending June 9, 2012.

E-Book Fiction

1.     FIFTY SHADES OF GREY, by E. L. James
2.     FIFTY SHADES DARKER, by E. L. James
3.     FIFTY SHADES FREED, by E. L. James
4.     GONE GIRL, by Gillian Flynn
5.     FIFTY SHADES TRILOGY, by E. L. James

E-Book Nonfiction

1.     WILD, by Cheryl Strayed
2.     THE AMATEUR, by Edward Klein
3.     UNBROKEN, by Laura Hillenbrand
4.     I HATE EVERYONE . . . STARTING WITH ME, by Joan Rivers
5.     THE GREAT DESTROYER, by David Limbaugh

Wall Street Journal E-Book Best Sellers (Week Ended June 10)

Nonfiction E-Books
TITLE
AUTHOR / PUBLISHER
THIS WEEK
LAST
WEEK
Wild
1
6
Cheryl Strayed/Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
The Amateur
2
1
Edward Klein/Regnery Publishing
Unbroken
3
3
Laura Hillenbrand/Random House
Eat to Live
4
Joel Fuhrman/Little, Brown
I Hate Everyone...Starting With Me
5
New
Joan Rivers/Penguin Group
The Great Destroyer
6
New
David Limbaugh/Regnery Publishing
Make Him Beg to Be Your Boyfriend in 6 Simple Steps
7
New
Michael Fiore/Digital Romance Inc.
Let's Pretend This Never Happened
8
Jenny Lawson/Penguin Group
Killing Lincoln
9
9
Bill O'Reilly, Martin Dugard/Henry Holt & Co.
Heaven Is For Real
10
8
Todd Burpo with Lynn Vincent/Thomas Nelson Publishers

Fiction E-Books
TITLE
AUTHOR / PUBLISHER
THIS WEEK
LAST
WEEK
Fifty Shades of Grey
1
1
E.L. James/Vintage
Fifty Shades Darker
2
2
E.L. James/Vintage
Fifty Shades Freed
3
3
E.L. James/Vintage
Gone Girl
4
New
Gillian Flynn/Crown Publishing Group
Mockingjay
5
4
Suzanne Collins/Scholastic
Catching Fire
6
5
Suzanne Collins/Scholastic
Kiss the Dead
7
New
Laurell K. Hamilton/Penguin Group
The Hunger Games
8
8
Suzanne Collins/Scholastic
On the Island
9
6
Tracey Garvis Graves/Tracey Garvis Graves
The Marriage Bargain
10
10
Jennifer Probst/Entangled Publishing

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