6 de maio de 2012

Leituras Digitais (29 de Abril a 5 de Maio)



Rubrica semanal de notícias e artigos relacionados com a edição de livros digitais.

Everyone is paying attention to the e-book pricing fight against Amazon right now, but Bloomberg Businessweek reports there’s another disagreement going on between Amazon and the publishers behind the scenes that nobody has really noticed: the question of print on demand.
Barnes & Noble, which analysts believe needs deeper financial pockets and a global presence to compete in the digital reading space with Amazon and Apple, solved both of those issues Monday morning, creating a new subsidiary in partnership with Microsoft. The new unit, temporarily named Newco, will house B&N’s digital assets, as well as its college stores, and will be backed by a $300 million investment from Microsoft that will give the tech company a 17.8% stake in Newco.
At least initially Newco will be focused on supporting reading applications for Windows 8 including the development of Nook app for the Windows 8 platform, although both B&N CEO William Lynch and Microsoft president Andy Lees emphasized they see a broad range of possibilities of development new products that will broaden the way content in created, consumed and published. Both men also repeatedly emphasized the global aspect of link with Microsoft with Lynch noting in a conference call that all of the global customers drawn in by Microsoft will be new since, to date B&N’s digital business has had no global presence.
Consumer ebook sales in the UK increased by 366% last year helping to offset a decline in the market for printed books, according to new official figures.
Drawing its data from information provided by 250 publishers, the Publishers Association's Statistics Yearbook put the value of consumer ebook sales – fiction, non-fiction and children's digital titles – at £92m in 2011. This is a 366% increase on the previous year, the Publishers Association said, and consumer ebooks are now equivalent to 6% of consumer physical book sales by value.
As we continue to digitize...as we continue to adopt ebooks...as we continue to succumb to the allure of technology...let's also look for solutions that will eliminate the digital divide that still exists.  That might mean offering more training, installing more public access computing labs, loaning mobile devices, or remembering that paper is need a useful mode of communication.  Let's not be techno-snobs who ignore the reality in front of us.
Bestselling novelist Paulo Coelho has convinced HarperCollins to sell many of his eBooks for 99-cents in the United States and Canada. The sale prices are now in effect at Amazon, iTunes and Barnes & Noble.
The author could not predict how long the sale would last, but hopes to set the industry standard. In a blog post, Coelho explained that he hoped to make his digital books cost as much as a song in iTunes. The author helpfully did the book-buying math for his readers, revealing that purchasing all his discounted books will cost $10.89 versus $74.19 at regular prices.
But as the author also notes, consumers don’t really care what a publisher’s costs are, nor are they likely to pay more simply because a publisher argues that their content is really valuable. In the same way, movie-goers don’t really care how many millions of dollars a movie studio spent on their latest blockbuster — that has no bearing on whether they want to see it or not. It is the perceived value of the e-book that matters, not the cost — and there are some good reasons why e-book consumers might want to pay less.
Getting the right combination of the physical and online sales channel is key to survival. For example, Borders sold e-readers from Sony and Rakuten, maker of the Kobo, and had Amazon run its online store. With no connection to the online customer, Borders didn't have enough to survive. The bookseller went out of business last year.
Barnes & Noble has not made the same mistakes as its one-time rival, and its current strategy actually plays into the habits of book readers. Codex has found that people who own e-readers also buy physical books. "They're not just pure-play e-readers; they are living in the print world, as well," Hildick-Smith said.
So what’s my point? It seems to me that publishers ought to be doing a much better job with the publication of ebooks, and how they represent and provide access to reference material. Keep in mind that, until I started writing this article, I never realized Mistborn had maps of any sort, because rather then starting me at the cover, ebooks start me at the first page of actual text—a nice feature, but it’s only really highlighting the problem with the serial presentation of information, a style of presentation that, it seems, does not need to exist in ebooks.
In some ways, I think we’re looking at ebooks all wrong. We keep looking at them as if they’re books but they’re not. Publishers ought to stop thinking as if ebooks are books, and start thinking of them as stories, and considering how the author intended the reference material to be of use to the text. I don’t really buy into the whole notion of ‘interactive’ ebooks or whatever you want to call them, because most of the ideas, of putting some sort of strange multimedia spin on the book format, really isn’t necessary. But It seems to me it’s also not necessary to stay within the confines of a book’s format either.
The Pottermore e-book store sold £3m-worth of Harry Potter e-books in its first month, the company's chief executive has revealed, while the Pottermore experience, which allows fans to explore the Harry Potter universe online, added five million new users in the two weeks since its own launch on 14th April.
Charlie Redmayne said sales at the online shop, which went live on 27th March, had been driven first by pent-up demand, with the sales value high because of the number of Harry Potter fans buying the e-book bundle, priced at £38.64, a discount of 14% on the cost of buying the seven titles individually.
In mature gadget markets – like DVD players and MP3 players – formats stop mattering altogether. Especially at the low end of the market, these devices support every format their makers can discover. The cheap-and-cheerful manufacturers at the low end don't have a secondary market they're trying to protect, no app store or crucial vendor relationship with a big distributor or publisher. They just want a product that ticks the box for every possible customer. Since multiformat support is just a matter of getting the software right, what tends to happen is that a standard, commodity firmware emerges for these devices that just works for just about everything, and the formats vanish into the background.
Now that Tor has dropped DRM – and acquired a valuable halo of virtue among committed ebook readers, who'll celebrate their bravery – it's inevitable that the competition will follow. It seems we have reached the beginning of the end of the ebook format wars, which is good news for readers, writers and publishers.
New York Times E-Book Best Sellers

A version of this list appears in the May 13, 2012 issue of The New York Times Book Review. Rankings reflect sales for the week ending April 28, 2012.

E-Book Fiction

1.                      FIFTY SHADES OF GREY, by E. L. James
2.                      FIFTY SHADES DARKER, by E. L. James
3.                      FIFTY SHADES FREED, by E. L. James
4.                      THE WIND THROUGH THE KEYHOLE, by Stephen King
5.                      SUNRISE POINT, by Robyn Carr

E-Book Nonfiction

1.                      LIFEBOAT NO. 8, by Elizabeth Kaye
2.                      LET’S PRETEND THIS NEVER HAPPENED, by Jenny Lawson
3.                      LOTS OF CANDLES, PLENTY OF CAKE, by Anna Quindlen
4.                      MRS. KENNEDY AND ME, by Clint Hill with Lisa McCubbin
5.                      THE POWER OF HABIT, by Charles Duhigg

Wall Street Journal E-Book Best Sellers (Week Ended April 29)

Nonfiction E-Books
TITLE
AUTHOR / PUBLISHER
THIS WEEK
LAST
WEEK
Act Like a Lady, Think Like a Man
1
8
Steve Harvey/HarperCollins
Lifeboat No. 8
2
1
Elizabeth Kaye/Elizabeth Kaye
Let's Pretend This Never Happened
3
2
Jenny Lawson/Penguin Group
Lots of Candles, Plenty of Cake
4
New
Anna Quindlen/Random House
Heroes and Monsters
5
Josh James Riebock/Baker Publishing Group
Mrs. Kennedy and Me
6
7
Clint Hill with Lisa McCubbin/Gallery Books
The Power of Habit
7
9
Charles Duhigg/Random House
Heaven Is For Real
8
Todd Burpo with Lynn Vincent/Thomas Nelson Publishers
Steve Jobs
9
10
Walter Isaacson/Simon & Schuster
Unbroken
10
Laura Hillenbrand/Random House

Fiction E-Books
TITLE
AUTHOR / PUBLISHER
THIS WEEK
LAST
WEEK
Fifty Shades of Grey
1
1
E.L. James/The Writer's Coffee Shop Publishing House
Fifty Shades Darker
2
2
E.L. James/Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
Fifty Shades Freed
3
3
E.L. James/Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
Mockingjay
4
4
Suzanne Collins/Scholastic
Catching Fire
5
5
Suzanne Collins/Scholastic
The Hunger Games
6
8
Suzanne Collins/Scholastic
Sunrise Point
7
New
Robyn Carr/Mira
The Wind Through the Keyhole
8
New
Stephen King/Scribner
The Lucky One
9
9
Nicholas Sparks/Grand Central Publishing
The Innocent
10
7
David Baldacci/Grand Central Publishing

Infográficos
(Clique para aumentar.)

Vídeos

NOOK Simple Touch with GlowLight


Wexler.Flex One Crushtest. First flexible e-ink reader

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