27 de maio de 2012

Leituras Digitais (20 a 26 de Maio)



Rubrica semanal de notícias e artigos relacionados com a edição de livros digitais.

Waterstones has announced a surprise tie-up with Amazon that will enable shoppers to pluck ebooks as well as physical books from its shelves.
The companies did not reveal the terms of the deal, but Waterstones said it was planning a digital revolution in its stores, with Kindle e-readers on sale for the first time and free Wi-Fi, so customers can choose between buying a physical book or downloading it there and then. It is also opening instore cafes as part of an upgrade of the 30-year old chain.
One popular image of the library of the future comes from the cartoon Futurama. The temporally misplaced character from our own time, Fry, enters Mars University’s Wong Library with his friends. It contains the largest collection of literature in the universe. Zoom in on two CDs, one labeled “Fiction” and the other “Non-fiction.”
In many ways, the library of today looks much the same as the library of yesteryear. The card catalogs may be consigned to a basement storage area and the tables where they used to stand are studded with computers. But otherwise there are carrels and stacks, stairs and information desk, patrons and librarians.
Transition is underway: from a place where you go to get information to a place you go to create; and from a place you go to create to a service you use.
OnlineUniversities.com has a post by Justin Marquis Ph.D. looking at the alarming trend of declining reading rates over the last few decades, and bringing up the recent Pew study showing that e-reader owners read more as a possible harbinger of ways to reduce the trend.
People who read more, Marquis points out, become more “interesting, engaged, and intellectual”. They have a higher degree of emotional as well as standard literacy, developing empathy through repeatedly putting themselves in the place of the characters they read about. Adolescents who don’t develop good reading habits are at a disadvantage in college where so much of learning is based on reading. And the more people who read individually, the more that greater society as a whole is more intellectually engaged.
Integrated Learning Systems are edging out both print and e-textbooks in popularity with students, says new research from the Book Industry Study Group (BISG)'s ongoing study of Student Attitudes Toward Content in Higher Education. The second installment in Volume Two of the study, which is powered by Bowker Market Research, shows that nearly 48 percent of students feel Integrated Learning Systems help with their studying; compare that with 45 percent for the core physical textbook and just 37 percent for the e-textbook. Further, nearly half of student respondents feel that Integrated Learning Systems help them improve their grade, compared with 40 percent for print texts and 33 percent for e-texts.
One of the first lessons that every indie author needs to learn is that they must always be selling their writing. You can’t just write and hope someone else will pick up the sales ball. I know that seems obvious, but it is the scope of what constitutes selling that I think gets missed. Even such simple things as how the ebook is designed is selling. Choosing the right typeface and font size is selling. Providing metadata for running heads for those devices that will display a running head is selling. Participation in forums of readers and constantly mentioning your writing is selling. A well-done cover design is selling.
For many people, selling themselves is the hardest thing to do in the world. It is why in law firms the “rainmakers” are considered more valuable than any other attorney in the firm; it is the rainmakers who bring in the business by selling themselves and the firm. The indie author has to be his or her own rainmaker.
Our survey found that some people use their e-reader just for work – like the sociology professor reading From Max Weber in Union Square. Other segregate their reading based on the experience of reading in print versus on a device.
Christopher Robinson works in publishing and was initially hesitant to join the e-reader revolution. But after his uncle gave him a Barnes & Noble Nook for Christmas, he now does most all his reading electronically – except for art books and poetry. He still prefers to read those two categories in print “because it’s just nicer to have it on a page, away from any distraction, with just the white space of the page.”
According to new research by discount website MyVoucherCodes.co.uk, people have been buying e-readers to disguise the embarrassing books they're reading. The poll of 1,863 e-reader owners found that 58 per cent had acquired the device partly so as to disguise their taste in erotic and/or children's fiction.
E-book sales have skyrocketed thanks, in large part, to genre fiction: horror, crime, sci-fi and so on. Half of all erotic fiction sold is in e-book format, compared with just 20 per cent of general fiction. Romance publisher Mills & Boon releases around 100 digital titles a month, but just 55 physical titles.
So maybe publishers should treat indies like showrooms, and send their books to indies on consignment. That means that only if and when a book sells is money paid to the publisher. The books in the store shouldn’t be the focus of the revenue. Instead, the revenue might come from membership fees, book rentals, and referral fees for drop shipped new copies or ebook sales. Members of this store/library then would have a stake in keeping the store/library open, so presumably they would have little motivation to misuse ebook files. Then I as a publisher might have a reason to trust the store and those members with DRM free files. I would offer DRM free files in a store like that, where there is a relationship between the file and the store and the customer/patron. We are all shareholders in that scenario. I think other publishers might consider offering DRM free files in such a scenario too, but perhaps I’m too pie in the sky. If your local bookstore/library depended on the revenue ebook sales and rentals generated, you would have a stake in that revenue. I would hope that that could be an environment where publishers might be willing experiment with trust. But then again, I’ve been known to believe in lost causes before, and have been absolutely wrong.
New York Times E-Book Best Sellers

A version of this list appears in the June 3, 2012 issue of The New York Times Book Review. Rankings reflect sales for the week ending May 19, 2012.

E-Book Fiction

1.                      FIFTY SHADES OF GREY, by E. L. James
2.                      FIFTY SHADES DARKER, by E. L. James
3.                      FIFTY SHADES FREED, by E. L. James
4.                      STOLEN PREY, by John Sandford
5.                      FIFTY SHADES TRILOGY, by E. L. James

E-Book Nonfiction

1.                      THE AMATEUR, by Edward Klein
2.                      I SUCK AT GIRLS, by Justin Halpern
3.                      THE ART OF INTELLIGENCE, by Henry A. Crumpton
4.                      THE VOW, by Kim and Krickitt Carpenter with Dana Wilkerson
5.                      UNBROKEN, by Laura Hillenbrand

Wall Street Journal E-Book Best Sellers (Week Ended May 20)

Nonfiction E-Books
TITLE
AUTHOR / PUBLISHER
THIS WEEK
LAST
WEEK
Desperate Passage
1
Ethan Rarick/Oxford University Press
The Amateur
2
New
Edward Klein/Regnery Publishing
Act Like a Lady, Think Like a Man
3
9
Steve Harvey/HarperCollins
The Skinny Rules
4
New
Bob Harper with Greg Critser/Random House
The Art of Intelligence
5
New
Henry A. Crumpton/Penguin Group
I Suck at Girls
6
New
Justin Halpern/HarperCollins
Soulless
7
2
Gail Carriger, Bob Condor/Orbit
The Vow
8
8
Kim Carpenter, Krickitt Carpenter with Dana Wilkerson/B&H Publishing Group
Unbroken
9
10
Laura Hillenbrand/Random House
Let's Pretend This Never Happened
10
Jenny Lawson/Penguin Group

Fiction E-Books
TITLE
AUTHOR / PUBLISHER
THIS WEEK
LAST
WEEK
Fifty Shades of Grey
1
1
E.L. James/Vintage
Fifty Shades Darker
2
2
E.L. James/Vintage
Fifty Shades Freed
3
3
E.L. James/Vintage
Mockingjay
4
5
Suzanne Collins/Scholastic
Stolen Prey
5
New
John Sandford/Penguin Group
Catching Fire
6
6
Suzanne Collins/Scholastic
The Hunger Games
7
8
Suzanne Collins/Scholastic
11th Hour
8
4
James Patterson, Maxine Paetro/Little, Brown
On the Island
9
Tracey Garvis Graves/Tracey Garvis Graves
The Innocent
10
10
David Baldacci/Grand Central Publishing

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