22 de abril de 2012

Leituras Digitais (15 a 21 de Abril)



Rubrica semanal de notícias e artigos relacionados com a edição de livros digitais.

The bottom line is that an ebook is less valuable than a pbook. It is less valuable because it cannot be collected; it cannot provide the visual gratification that a physical library, like a piece of art, can; it is licensed rather than owned; and, most importantly, it has no ability to increase in value over time if properly cared for and curated because it has no rarity. The ebook versions of the Hunger Games Trilogy will never have an intrinsic collectible value of $50, let alone of $3,000. There will never be a scarcity of the ebooks.
Will today’s existing conglomerates continue to dominate the future of publishing? Or, will technology enable a rising tide of upstarts and independents that will forever change the publishing landscape? That was the question at the heart of the London Book Fair’s Second Annual Great Debate, which put forth the following resolution: In the fight for survival, outsiders and startups are taking on today’s heavyweights and will ultimately deliver a knockout punch.
The store offers over 100 thousand titles with prices ranging from £1 to £13. You can also find periodicals there. Newspapers including The Guardian, The Daily Mail, and The Observer can be bought on the site by the issue. You can also get the newspapers via a monthly subscription.
There is also no reason to think that the agency model will lead to higher consumer prices once the e-book market matures. Indeed, unlike the physical book market—which entails significant variable costs associated with printing, inventorying, and distributing books—these costs are rather negligible for e-books. Moreover, the demand for e-books is relatively elastic, meaning that as the price of e-books declines, consumers are likely to buy more books. This combination of low variable costs and elastic demand suggests that lowering consumer prices to the point that makes e-books financially viable for both publishers and distributors might be in their long-run best interests. So far, there is no reason to think that this cannot occur under the agency pricing model as long as the distribution market for e-books remains competitive.
The settlement agreement says that publishers cannot prevent a retailer from discounting the publishers ebooks except that it can require the retailer to make a profit across the publisher’s line. I find that an interesting proviso. Consider how secretive Amazon has been about how many ebooks it really has been selling. Amazon has only been forthcoming with broad numbers and in a few cases announcing that an author has joined the millions club. Will Amazon, who is not a party to the proceedings, voluntarily share sales information? I doubt it.
Yet the sharing of that information is necessary to make the exception meaningful. If the wholesale price, that is, the price the ebooksellers have to pay the publisher, of the new James Patterson ebook novel is $13 and Amazon sells it for $10 and sells 1 million ebook copies for a $3 million loss, somehow Amazon must sell enough other books in that publisher’s line to overcome the loss. How is that going to work?
What we don't need is more shouting and finger-pointing, nor more assumptions that there's one "right" model for all e-book sales. Textbooks are expensive. Tight DRM might make more sense for them than for consumer entertainment novels, especially when the target for those novels will probably find it easier to just buy a copy rather than hunt down an edition on the Web somewhere.
In the end, if the Department of Justice is going to come down on publishers for anything, I'd hope that it finds a way to do it over locking us into platforms. Taking away our book rights is a pricing issue too.
Amazon is a catalog, not a bookstore. Booksellers provide services to you that few appreciate, at least to the point of financially supporting us. Amazon also makes use of our services, in that we’re helping their customers, too; it’s our job to sell books even if we can’t bank the sale.
Imagine the bookstore with no sales staff, just cashiers. That’s the future we’re already heading towards as more bookstores are forced to hire fewer booksellers — or even to let a few go.
Imagine your hometown or neighborhood without a bookstore. Some of you don’t have to imagine, as one major chain has already closed.
There are solutions. One can even compete with Amazon. But the new bookstore will likely look a bit different than anyone is used to.
New York Times E-Book Best Sellers

A version of this list appears in the April 29, 2012 issue of The New York Times Book Review. Rankings reflect sales for the week ending April 14, 2012.

E-Book Fiction

1.                      FIFTY SHADES OF GREY, by E. L. James
2.                      FIFTY SHADES DARKER, by E. L. James
3.                      FIFTY SHADES FREED, by E. L. James
4.                      CALICO JOE, by John Grisham
5.                      THE LUCKY ONE, by Nicholas Sparks

E-Book Nonfiction

1.                      A NIGHT TO REMEMBER, by Walter Lord
2.                      LIFEBOAT NO. 8, by Elizabeth Kaye
3.                      MRS. KENNEDY AND ME, by Clint Hill with Lisa McCubbin
4.                      DROP DEAD HEALTHY, by A. J. Jacobs
5.                      HEAVEN IS FOR REAL, by Todd Burpo with Lynn Vincent

Wall Street Journal E-Book Best Sellers (Week Ended April 15)

Nonfiction E-Books
TITLE
AUTHOR / PUBLISHER
THIS WEEK
LAST
WEEK
A Night to Remember
1
Walter Lord/Open Road
Lifeboat No. 8
2
4
Elizabeth Kaye/Elizabeth Kaye
Mrs. Kennedy and Me
3
1
Clint Hill with Lisa McCubbin/Gallery Books
Heaven Is For Real
4
9
Todd Burpo with Lynn Vincent/Thomas Nelson Publishers
The Power of Habit
5
6
Charles Duhigg/Random House
Drop Dead Healthy
6
New
A.J. Jacobs/Simon & Schuster
Steve Jobs
7
5
Walter Isaacson/Simon & Schuster
The Food Revolution
8
John Robbins/Red Wheel/Weiser
Escape From Camp 14
9
7
Blaine Harden/Penguin Group
The Big Miss
10
3
Hank Haney/Crown Publishing Group

Fiction E-Books
TITLE
AUTHOR / PUBLISHER
THIS WEEK
LAST
WEEK
Fifty Shades of Grey
1
2
E.L. James/The Writer's Coffee Shop Publishing House
Mockingjay
2
3
Suzanne Collins/Scholastic
Catching Fire
3
1
Suzanne Collins/Scholastic
Fifty Shades Darker
4
5
E.L. James/Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
The Hunger Games
5
4
Suzanne Collins/Scholastic
Fifty Shades Freed
6
6
E.L. James/Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
Calico Joe
7
New
John Grisham/Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
The Lucky One
8
7
Nicholas Sparks/Grand Central Publishing
Guilty Wives
9
8
James Patterson, David Ellis/Little, Brown
On the Island
10
10
Tracey Garvis Graves/Tracey Garvis Graves

Vídeos

OverDrive CEO Steve Potash on Digital Library Lending

Why the Social Game Industry Needs Writers

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