11 de março de 2012

Leituras Digitais (4 a 10 de Março)



Rubrica semanal de notícias e artigos relacionados com a edição de livros digitais.

My own expectation is that over the next five years we’ll see the share of sales that are ebooks more than double. (This should be seen as a startlingly conservative prediction, since that number has doubled annually for the past five years!) That would put ebook unit sales at about 65% for commercial immersive reading. (I’m grossing up the 20% of revenue number the big houses are reporting because ebooks produce less revenue than print hardcovers and because many titles in the print revenue base aren’t in the ebook revenue base.)
Of the remaining 35% allocated to print, I’d expect half of the sales, at least, to be online. If those numbers are right, then 17.5% of immersive book sales would be in brick stores.
We have since seen several high-profile stories making a case for the continued existence of traditional publishers and agents (Ian Rankin, Anthony Horowitz) and it has become clear even to this publishing novice that, however easy it is to criticise the industry for being resistant to change, no-one but the most ill-informed is suggesting that their function is obsolete. Last year Amanda Hocking gave a very reasoned explanation for why she signed up with a publisher and last week Kerry Wilkinson outlined the benefits of having an agent. I’m sure we’ll continue to see similar blogs from successful self-published authors and Kindle millionaires, simply because publishers and agents are still good at performing their key roles.
The real question is, with their wealth of experience and skills, why publishers aren’t putting up more of a fight, both on the PR front and on a practical level. Publishers don’t have to justify their existence to readers, but they increasingly need to fight to win the authors who could choose to self-publish or be tempted by the 70% royalties from Amazon. So, what should they be doing? Allow me to speculate.
After more than 18 months of development, Scholastic has begun beta tests for Storia, its proprietary e-book platform for selling and distributing its trade titles as well as digital editions of titles from other children’s houses. The beta test features 1,300 titles with the vast majority published by Scholastic; Deborah Forte, executive v-p and president of Scholastic Media, said she expects Storia to have about 2,000 titles when it makes its official debut in the fall.
Dark Horse Comics announced today that about 100 of its graphic novels now appear on the Nook tablet and Kobo’s Vox tablet. The novels don’t yet appear on the Kindle Fire; they have appeared on the iPad since last April.
“That’s a space [the Kindle Fire] that we’re really interested in moving toward,” said Matt Parkinson, senior vice president of marketing at Dark Horse. “In terms of formatting and contractually, we found that these spaces [Barnes & Noble and Kobo] were much easier to work through. We haven’t found a deal with Amazon that is completely suitable for us.”
We’re pleased to announce that pottermore.com will be open to everyone in early April 2012.
We know that the extended wait for those wishing to be part of Pottermore has been frustrating, and we’d like to thank you all for your patience so far.
The five largest publishers, including Britain's Penguin Group, face legal action from the US Justice Department for colluding to raise the prices of electronic books, a source has told Reuters.
Several parties are said to have held talks to settle the potential antitrust case after an investigation into deals signed with Apple by Pearson-owned Penguin, Simon & Schuster, Hachette Book Group, Macmillan and News Corp's HarperCollins Publishers.

New York Times E-Book Best Sellers

A version of this list appears in the March 18, 2012 issue of The New York Times Book Review. Rankings reflect sales for the week ending March 3, 2012.

E-Book Fiction

1.                      FIFTY SHADES OF GREY, by E. L. James
2.                      LONE WOLF, by Jodi Picoult
3.                      REDWOOD BEND, by Robyn Carr
4.                      VICTIMS, by Jonathan Kellerman
5.                      THE DARKEST SEDUCTION, by Gena Showalter

E-Book Nonfiction

1.                      THE VOW, by Kim and Krickitt Carpenter with Dana Wilkerson
2.                      THE POWER OF HABIT, by Charles Duhigg
3.                      HEAVEN IS FOR REAL, by Todd Burpo with Lynn Vincent
4.                      STEVE JOBS, by Walter Isaacson
5.                      UNBROKEN, by Laura Hillenbrand

Wall Street Journal E-Book Best Sellers (Week Ended March 4)

Nonfiction E-Books
TITLE
AUTHOR / PUBLISHER
THIS WEEK
LAST
WEEK
The Vow
1
1
Kim Carpenter, Krickitt Carpenter with Dana Wilkerson/B&H Publishing Group
I'm Dancing as Fast as I Can
2
Barbara Gordon/Stephens Press
The Power of Habit
3
New
Charles Duhigg/Random House
Heaven Is For Real
4
5
Todd Burpo with Lynn Vincent/Thomas Nelson Publishers
Steve Jobs
5
8
Walter Isaacson/Simon & Schuster
Unbroken
6
9
Laura Hillenbrand/Random House
American Sniper
7
7
Chris Kyle with Scott McEwen, Jim DeFelice/William Morrow & Co.
Auschwitz
8
Miklos Nyiszli/Skyhorse Publishing
The Blood Sugar Solution
9
New
Mark Hyman/Little, Brown
Full Service
10
Scotty Bowers/Grove/Atlantic

Fiction E-Books
TITLE
AUTHOR / PUBLISHER
THIS WEEK
LAST
WEEK
The Hunger Games
1
1
Suzanne Collins/Scholastic
Fifty Shades of Grey
2
E.L. James/The Writer's Coffee Shop Publishing House
Catching Fire
3
2
Suzanne Collins/Scholastic
Mockingjay
4
3
Suzanne Collins/Scholastic
Lone Wolf
5
New
Jodi Picoult/Atria/Emily Bestler Books
Redwood Bend
6
New
Robyn Carr/Mira
Victims
7
New
Jonathan Kellerman/Random House
The Darkest Seduction
8
New
Gena Showalter/Harlequin
Defending Jacob
9
7
William Landay/Random House
The Sweetest Thing
10
6
Barbara Freethy/Barbara Freethy

Vídeos

What E-Books Won't Tell You

Introducing Google Play

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