25 de março de 2012

Leituras Digitais (18 a 24 de Março)



Rubrica semanal de notícias e artigos relacionados com a edição de livros digitais.

Publishers’ concerns about the impact of library lending are reasonable. But responding to that concern by simply “freezing” is not helpful to anybody and it may actually be damaging the sales of the books the publishers are trying to protect. I don’t know and the librarians don’t know what the marketplace impact will be of branded ebooks being made available through libraries, but the publishers don’t know either. It is time for all of us to start finding out.
“No one really knows the ultimate effects of an immersion in a digital medium on the young developing brain.” But “my greatest concern is that the young brain will never have the time (in milliseconds or in hours or in years) to learn to go deeper into the text after the first decoding, but rather will be pulled by the medium to ever more distracting information, sidebars, and now, perhaps, videos (in the new vooks).”
Do we remember less when we read e-books? Some neuroscientists think we do, because e-books don’t provide the same sorts of spatial queues that printed books do. Apparently location cues are a very powerful aid to remembering things—and just the fact that we know about how far through a book those particular things are helps us fix them in our memory.
Jakob Nielsen, a Web “usability” expert and principal of the Nielsen Norman Group, believes e-reading does lead to a different type of recall. “I really do think we remember less” from e-books, he says. “This is not something I have formally measured, but just based on both studies we’ve done looking at reading behavior on tablets and books and reading from regular computers.”
Deep in the heart of Italy a dream is growing.  An already large, but growing collection of ereaders is being brought together as the start of a planned museum of ereaders.
Is the book publishing business as we know it dead or dying? If you believe everything you read, you might think so.
I might be in the minority opinion among publishing business observers, but I happen to think that it’s a vibrant business going through a difficult transition from which it will emerge stronger than ever. And, yes, most of the big players we see today will survive intact.
Ted Striphas's The Late Age of Print will change how you think about books. Most of the ways we've been taught literature seek to make the print medium itself disappear. We are left thinking about the text as pure expression removed from the material conditions by which it is produced, distributed, and consumed. There is, to be sure, a strong history of work on the history of print and of books, but it still remains highly likely that you can get through most high school and college Literature classes and never really engage with books on that level. Yet, the prospect of delivering these texts through some other medium -- digital, perhaps -- may make many of us passionate defenders of the book as a vehicle for communicating knowledge, as a medium which shapes our experience of reading. So, that's where Striphas starts, with the recurring anxiety that books and book culture may be endangered, but he does not stop there, taking us deep into the history of book stores, book publishing, even the routing process by which books reach consumers. And the result is utterly fascinating.
We live in a time when social networks such as Facebook, Twitter, Google+, et al., not only connect us, they become part of our digital lifestyle. But it’s not just about how these networks help us connect and communicate with others. Whether we know it or not, our social activity now contributes to our stature within each network. New services such as Klout, PeerIndex among many others not only measure who you know, what you say, and what you do, they attempt to score or rank your ability to influence those to whom you’re connected. As a result, social network users are now starting to rethink how they connect and communicate to improve their stature within each network. And at the same time, brands are taking notice as these services also help organizations identify individuals who are both connected and relevant to help expand reach into new media and markets.
New York Times E-Book Best Sellers

A version of this list appears in the April 1, 2012 issue of The New York Times Book Review. Rankings reflect sales for the week ending March 17, 2012.

E-Book Fiction

1.                      FIFTY SHADES OF GREY, by E. L. James
2.                      FIFTY SHADES DARKER, by E. L. James
3.                      FIFTY SHADES FREED, by E. L. James
4.                      DEFENDING JACOB, by William Landay
5.                      UNFINISHED BUSINESS, by Nora Roberts

E-Book Nonfiction

1.                      THE IRISH AMERICANS, by Jay P. Dolan
2.                      THE VOW, by Kim and Krickitt Carpenter with Dana Wilkerson
3.                      HEAVEN IS FOR REAL, by Todd Burpo with Lynn Vincent
4.                      STEVE JOBS, by Walter Isaacson
5.                      THE POWER OF HABIT, by Charles Duhigg

Wall Street Journal E-Book Best Sellers (Week Ended Mar. 18)

Nonfiction E-Books
TITLE
AUTHOR / PUBLISHER
THIS WEEK
LAST
WEEK
Amazing Gracie
1
Dan Dye, Mark Beckloff/Workman Publishing Co.
The Irish Americans
2
Jay P. Dolan/Bloomsbury
Growing Up Amish
3
7
Ira Wagler/Tyndale House Publishers
The Vow
4
2
Kim Carpenter, Krickitt Carpenter with Dana Wilkerson/B&H Publishing Group
Heaven Is For Real
5
6
Todd Burpo with Lynn Vincent/Thomas Nelson Publishers
A Genius for Deception
6
Nicholas Rankin/Oxford University Press USA
Steve Jobs
7
9
Walter Isaacson/Simon & Schuster
The Power of Habit
8
4
Charles Duhigg/Random House
Unbroken
9
Laura Hillenbrand/Random House
Bearded Lady
10
New
Mara Altman/Mara Altman

Fiction E-Books
TITLE
AUTHOR / PUBLISHER
THIS WEEK
LAST
WEEK
Fifty Shades of Grey
1
3
E.L. James/The Writer's Coffee Shop Publishing House
The Hunger Games
2
1
Suzanne Collins/Scholastic
Catching Fire
3
2
Suzanne Collins/Scholastic
Mockingjay
4
4
Suzanne Collins/Scholastic
Fifty Shades Darker
5
5
E.L. James/Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
Fifty Shades Freed
6
6
E.L. James/Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
The Crossroads Cafe
7
Deborah Smith/BelleBooks
Defending Jacob
8
8
William Landay/Random House
Unfinished Business
9
Nora Roberts/Silhouette
The Lucky One
10
Nicholas Sparks/Grand Central Publishing

Vídeos

James McQuivey on Amazon vs Apple

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