12 de fevereiro de 2012

Colóquio "Dracula and the Gothic"



Encontra-se aberto - até 15 de Abril -, o período de submissão de apresentações para o colóquio Dracula and the Gothic in Literature, Pop Culture and the Arts, que se irá realizar a 29 e 30 de Junho deste ano, na Universidade do Minho, em Braga. A informação detalhada relativa ao evento pode ser consultada aqui.
Few literary works have had such a lasting influence on popular culture as Bram Stoker’s Dracula (1897). One hundred years after the Irish author’s death, the abundance of adaptations of the Romanian Count’s tale spans over all the arts and modes of expression. More than 200 film versions of Dracula exist, from Murnau’s inaugural 1922 Nosferatu to Coppola’s 1992 box office hit, but it is perhaps Bela Lugosi’s iconic interpretation in the 1931 horror film classic that first comes to mind. Theatre plays and musicals, as well as dance performances, also abound, making Dracula a trendy stage motif. TV adaptations are countless and even a remarkable radio version of Stoker’s story by Orson Welles (1938) is on record. Stoker’s character also features in such diverse media as video games, cartoons, comics, anime and manga.

In literature, the Gothic – a combination of horror, romance and melodrama in supernatural plots – can be traced back to Walpole’s 1764 The Castle of Otranto, A Gothic story, and the vampire theme also bears a Romantic matrix: Lord Byron’s epic poem “The Giaour” (1813), Coleridge’s “Christabel” (1816) and John W. Polidori’s short story The Vampyre (1819), not to mention Mary Shelley's Frankenstein (1818), all present undead creatures as their uncanny protagonists. After Elizabeth C. Grey’s influential story The Skeleton Count (1828), two Victorian milestones are Varney the Vampire (1847), attributed to James M. Rymer, and Sheridan le Fanu’s novella Carmilla (1872). In the 20th century, Gothic and vampire fiction proliferated, with such authors as Algemon Blackwood, William Hodgson, M. R. James and, of course, H.P. Lovecraft, the most reputed writer of ‘cosmic horror’. To this day a steady production flow, which ranges from Richard Matheson to best-selling Stephen King, bears witness to Stoker’s 'undying' impact.

This interdisciplinary colloquium seeks to reappraise the multimodal and multimedia adaptations of Stoker’s Dracula, in their literary, cinematic, theatrical, televised and computerized facets, as well as the origins, evolution, imagery, mythology, theory and criticism of Gothic fiction and of the Gothic (sub)culture.

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