1 de janeiro de 2012

Leituras Digitais (25 a 31 de Dezembro)




Rubrica semanal de notícias e artigos relacionados com a edição de livros digitais.

“Basically, we decided to mimic our own reading process,” Mr. Johnson said “When I read a great classic, if I like it, I want the experience to somehow continue, so I will pursue more information about the writer, or the setting, or some aspect of the plot’s background. (Dueling? What’s up with that?) My mind wanders, imagining what the world of the book looked like. And so on. Now we have curated exactly that kind of material, and it allows you to linger in the world of the book, to understand more about it — to simply luxuriate in the world of the book longer. It’s something more than just the book, but something very much ‘of’ the book. This seems very innovative to me at the same time that it seems kind of an obvious innovation.”
The study of word processing may sound like a peculiarly tech-minded task for an English professor, but literary scholars have become increasingly interested in studying how the tools of writing both shape literature and are reflected in it, whether it’s the quill pen of the Romantic poets or the early round typewriter, known as a writing ball, that Friedrich Nietzsche used to compose some aphoristic fragments. (“Our writing tools are also working on our thoughts,” Nietzsche typed.)
Some scholars have argued that Bram Stoker’s “Dracula,” described in its introduction as cobbled together from a “mass of typewriting” dictated to the fictional Mina Harker, is really an allegory of the vampiric nature of modern communications media. Others have attributed the tangled style of Henry James’s late novels to his method of dictating them aloud to a “typewriter,” a term used at the time both to describe the machine itself and the person, usually a woman, operating it.
The publisher delivers a single file.  With that file, Ingram Content Group will deliver the content globally in a variety of ways, whether as a printed book or as a digital file which will ultimately create books for every digital platform around the world.  They have the industry’s largest active book inventory (access to 7.5 million titles) and the markets they serve include bookstores, libraries, schools, and specialty retailers.
What do the book makers believe about the future of reading?
Amazon is leveraging its platform to create an overall experience for customers to interact with the company and its services. With Amazon Prime, the Kindle line and its music and video services, the company is turning mere customers into “Amazon users.” In a recent open thread on Mashable, most Kindle Fire owners had good things to say about the device, despite its well-documented flaws. That’s real brand loyalty.
In the longer term, Amazon could even unify its store, services and customers into something resembling a social network. Of course, then Amazon would pick up yet another chief rival, Facebook, so the company is probably not in a hurry to do that. After all, Bezos needs to leave something for 2013.
As it stands, contemporary public libraries in the U.S. are not wholly removed from the world of commerce: part of every library circulation system is a module capable of handing fines for lost or overdue items, supporting holds or placements, billing, and recovery procedures. Many libraries already charge for video, computer games, and audiobook rentals. Therefore most libraries are positioned to support some form of per-loan fee without extensive modification of their software. And more importantly, if a central coordinating agency for libraries existed, then public libraries could rely on it to coordinate the acquisition of content and charges for borrowed items.
If one of the options we could discuss was charging for e-book access, particularly for frontlist or “top titles,” while print book access remained free, perhaps libraries and publishers could get a bit further down the road to serving the needs of readers.

The European Commission says 2011 progress against its digital agenda ambitions has been “mixed”.
“Of the 21 actions under this heading, 8 are completed, 5 are delayed, and 8 are on track,” according to the EC’s Digital Agenda for Europe Annual Progress Report 2011.
The project’s primary pillar is creating a “single digital market” to boost entertainment download and streaming services across borders, including by simplifying content licensing and harmonising online payments access.
The picture of publishing economics has changed dramatically.  Since the middle of 2011, Amazon is selling more eBooks than hardcover and paperback books combined.  What this trend makes clear, is it is becoming increasingly difficult to publish a book profitably based solely on bound book sales.  This article looks at HarperCollins' recently filed lawsuit against eBook publisher Open Road, and the role legacy publishing contracts, and contract ambiguity, plays in the battle over lucrative eBook rights.
New York Times E-Book Best Sellers

A version of this list appears in the January 8, 2012 issue of The New York Times Book Review. Rankings reflect sales for the week ending December 24, 2011.

E-Book Fiction

1.                      THE GIRL WITH THE DRAGON TATTOO, by Stieg Larsson
2.                      THE HELP, by Kathryn Stockett
3.                      THE LITIGATORS, by John Grisham
4.                      KILL ALEX CROSS, by James Patterson
5.                      11/22/63, by Stephen King

E-Book Nonfiction

1.                      STEVE JOBS, by Walter Isaacson
2.                      HEAVEN IS FOR REAL, by Todd Burpo with Lynn Vincent
3.                      KILLING LINCOLN, by Bill O'Reilly and Martin Dugard
4.                      UNBROKEN, by Laura Hillenbrand
5.                      BOSSYPANTS, by Tina Fey

Wall Street Journal E-Book Best Sellers (Week Ended Dec. 25)

Nonfiction E-Books
TITLE
AUTHOR / PUBLISHER
THIS WEEK
LAST
WEEK
Steve Jobs
1
1
Walter Isaacson/Simon & Schuster
Heaven Is For Real
2
3
Todd Burpo with Lynn Vincent/Thomas Nelson Publishers
Killing Lincoln
3
5
Bill O'Reilly, Martin Dugard/Henry Holt & Co.
Unbroken
4
6
Laura Hillenbrand/Random House
Catherine the Great
5
7
Robert K. Massie/Random House
Bossypants
6
Tina Fey/Little, Brown
The Proving Ground
7
G. Bruce Knecht/AmazonEncore
After Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil
8
Marilyn Bardsley/RosettaBooks
Thinking, Fast and Slow
9
9
Daniel Kahneman/Farrar, Straus & Giroux
In the Garden of Beasts
10
10
Erik Larson/Crown Publishing Group


Fiction E-Books
TITLE
AUTHOR / PUBLISHER
THIS WEEK
LAST
WEEK
The Hunger Games
1
1
Suzanne Collins/Scholastic
Catching Fire
2
3
Suzanne Collins/Scholastic
The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo
3
Stieg Larsson/Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
Mockingjay
4
4
Suzanne Collins/Scholastic
The Help
5
7
Kathryn Stockett/Penguin Group
The Litigators
6
6
John Grisham/Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
Kill Alex Cross
7
James Patterson/Little, Brown
11/22/63
8
9
Stephen King/Scribner
The Drop
9
8
Michael Connelly/Little, Brown
Red Mist
10
10
Patricia Cornwell/Penguin Group

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