15 de janeiro de 2012

Leituras Digitais (8 a 14 de Janeiro)



Rubrica semanal de notícias e artigos relacionados com a edição de livros digitais.

The pleasures of E means downloading the new book we fancy, from reviews, word-of-mouth or plain curiosity. The satisfactions of P come from acquiring lovely print editions for our bookshelves. In due course, but not quite yet, the world's writers and their agents will work out how fully to monetise this double market.
One unintended consequence of this irreversible trend has been to give the hardback a new lease of life. If the ebook is all about ease, and short attention spans, the ink and paper book must satisfy not just the thrill of reading, but the deep aesthetic pleasure associated with owning, holding and even scenting a favourite text. Already, there are signs that some publishers have cottoned on to this.
Strangely, it wasn’t him talking about games that grabbed my interest. It was hearing that Nintendo is planning to launch a digital e-reader type service where you can download books, magazines, newspapers, comics, and other publications to your Wii U console. These publications would stream to your Wii U controller’s touchscreen, and you could go lay in your bed or couch and read them. The touch screen would be used to flip through pages of an e-book or magazine, and there would even be a searchable index.
My source also told me that people with a 3DS will share the Wii U’s e-reader service, and it will be able to download books, magazines, newspapers, and comic books too.  You can zoom in and out of text and graphics.  Nintendo wants Wii U and 3DS to share certain services the same way Iphone/Ipad share services.
The K4 already has a lighted cover, but that one is designed to draw power from the K4. This cover has its own 1.5A battery, and it can even charge the Kindle.You’ll need 8 hours of direct sunlight to fully charge the backup battery, and SolarFocus is boasting that it can provide up to 3 months runtime for the K4.
The cover weighs around 8 ounces, and it’s available now. Retail is $80, and you can find it on Amazon, or in retail store including REI and LL Bean. SoloarFocus also has authorized resellers lined up for France, Canada and Holland.
Barnes & Noble said on Thursday that sales of Nook devices during the nine weeks that ended Dec. 31 grew 70 percent compared with the same period a year earlier.
I.H.S. iSuppli, a research company, estimates that Barnes & Noble has 13 percent of the e-reader market after two years in the business, versus 67 percent for Amazon. The company tracked shipments of display parts to prepare its estimates.
The commoditization of books is both good and bad. It is good because a wider range of authors are discovered. The Shayne Parkinsons, Vicki Tyleys, L.J. Sellers, and Richard Tuttles of the indie world — authors who write very well and excellent stories but who were unable (or unwilling) to break into the traditional publishing world — now have a chance to be discovered and claim the large and broad readership their writings deserve. I admit that prior to the commoditization of books, I would not have tried any of these authors. But once indie books were legitimized and books commoditized, I began to explore the indie world and found numerous gems, with some authors and books being better than what I could find in the traditional book world.
Commoditization is, however, also bad — bad for publishing, for authors, and readers — because in coming years the writers who currently make grand incomes from writing — the Stephen Kings and Tom Clancys of publishing — may well find themselves unable to attract an audience for their higher priced efforts. Granted that this is just the marketplace at work, but the pendulum can swing too far in either direction. As the market settles on a low price ceiling, that ceiling will become crowded and with the ease of entry into ebook publishing, it will become increasingly difficult to find the King and Clancy of the 2020s.
The digital revolution in libraries is not exactly a secret. Every day we read about some upheaval in the ebook industry, a new development in digitization, or yet another service from Google. And the recent announcement of an ALA-wide initiative on digital content and libraries, while important and necessary, won’t exactly make media headlines.
It is natural enough to focus on digital content, whiz-bang technology, and how libraries should provide innovative services for our communities. Yet there is more going on than meets the digital eye.
The digital revolution is not only changing how books are read—it is also changing the how they are written, produced, and promoted.
Dovetailing nicely with our story today about a publisher which re-puroposes journalists’ blogs into books, the Nieman Foundation for Journalism at Harvard University has published a free report entitled “Writing the Book” (PDF download), which offers more than 30 essays that examine different aspects of e-publishing.
The Guggenheim is one of the real standouts in the global modern art arena. The New York-based institution is no light-weight in the area of arts education. They've now extended that mission extensively by making dozens of high-quality publications on artists available to anyone with an Internet connection.
The books, art catalogues for major exhibitions at the museum, pop out into a clean, fast virtual book reader. Open Culture points out that the books are also available for download in a number of e-book formats, including ePub and PDF, at Archive.org's Guggenheim page.
New York Times E-Book Best Sellers

A version of this list appears in the January 22, 2012 issue of The New York Times Book Review. Rankings reflect sales for the week ending January 7, 2012.

E-Book Fiction

1.                      PRIVATE: #1 SUSPECT, by James Patterson and Maxine Paetro
2.                      THE HELP, by Kathryn Stockett
3.                      THE GIRL WITH THE DRAGON TATTOO, by Stieg Larsson
4.                      THE GIRL WHO PLAYED WITH FIRE, by Stieg Larsson
5.                      THE LITIGATORS, by John Grisham

E-Book Nonfiction

1.                      HEAVEN IS FOR REAL, by Todd Burpo with Lynn Vincent
2.                      AMERICAN SNIPER, by Chris Kyle with Scott McEwen and Jim DeFelice
3.                      STEVE JOBS, by Walter Isaacson
4.                      UNBROKEN, by Laura Hillenbrand
5.                      KILLING LINCOLN, by Bill O'Reilly and Martin Dugard

Wall Street Journal E-Book Best Sellers (Week Ended Jan. 8

Nonfiction E-Books
TITLE
AUTHOR / PUBLISHER
THIS WEEK
LAST
WEEK
American Sniper
1
New
Chris Kyle with Scott McEwen, Jim DeFelice/William Morrow & Co.
Heaven Is For Real
2
1
Todd Burpo with Lynn Vincent/Thomas Nelson Publishers
Steve Jobs
3
2
Walter Isaacson/Simon & Schuster
Eat That Frog!
4
Brian Tracy/Berrett-Koehler Publishers
Unbroken
5
4
Laura Hillenbrand/Random House
Killing Lincoln
6
3
Bill O'Reilly, Martin Dugard/Henry Holt & Co.
Longitude
7
Dava Sobel/Walter Books
Galileo's Daughter
8
Dava Sobel/Walter Books
Bossypants
9
6
Tina Fey/Little, Brown
1,000 Recordings to Hear Before You Die
10
Tom Moon/Workman Publishing Co.


Fiction E-Books
TITLE
AUTHOR / PUBLISHER
THIS WEEK
LAST
WEEK
The Hunger Games
1
1
Suzanne Collins/Scholastic
Catching Fire
2
2
Suzanne Collins/Scholastic
Mockingjay
3
4
Suzanne Collins/Scholastic
Private: #1 Suspect
4
New
James Patterson, Maxine Paetro/Little, Brown
The Help
5
3
Kathryn Stockett/Penguin Group
The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo
6
5
Stieg Larsson/Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
Chasing Rainbows
7
Kathleen Long/Kathleen Long
Already Gone
8
John Rector/Thomas & Mercer
Witch and Wizard
9
James Patterson/Little, Brown Books for Young Readers
The Girl Who Played With Fire
10
Stieg Larsson/Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group

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