8 de janeiro de 2012

Leituras Digitais (1 a 7 de Janeiro)



Rubrica semanal de notícias e artigos relacionados com a edição de livros digitais.

If reading were to decline significantly, it would change the very nature of our species. If we, in the future, are no longer wired for solitary reflection and creative thought, we will be diminished. But as a reader and a publisher, I am optimistic. Technology throws up as many solutions as it does challenges: for every door it closes, another opens. So the ability, offered by devices like e-readers, smartphones and tablets, to carry an entire library in your hand is an amazing opportunity. As publishers, we need to use every new piece of technology to embed long-form reading within our culture. We should concentrate on the message, not agonise over the medium. We should be agnostic on the platform, but evangelical about the content.
As many of you already know, the new Project MUSE platform formally launched yesterday. It’s home to more than 500 journals, over 14,000 ebooks from 66 university presses, faceted searching, and more.
As academic libraries add electronic monographs (e-books) to their collections in increasing numbers, they are frequently losing the ability to lend this portion of their collections via Interlibrary Loan (ILL) due to licensing restrictions.  Recently, new options have emerged as alternatives to traditional ILL for ebooks.  These options introduce new opportunities for collaboration across library departments and within consortia.  This article discusses the changing nature of resource sharing as related to e-books, examines e-book lending capabilities as they currently exist, and presents alternative models to traditional ILL, including short-term lending, purchase on demand and print on demand.
I have made previous mention of my notion that what has been one very cohesive trade book industry would “trifurcate”: break into at least three distinct businesses: 1) books that are straight narrative text intended for immersive reading; 2) adult books that are not straight text, either very chunkable (like cookbooks or travel books) or highly illustrated; and 3) children’s books. Admittedly, even this is an oversimplification.
This conjecture is built on the reality that we’ve learned how to move immersive reading from paper to screen in a way that satisfies the consumer. A pretty simple technological trick — “reflowing” the text so that it adjusts to the screen size alloted to it — makes the text “work” across a wide range of devices and reader software. There are definitely differences among Kindle and Nook and Kobo and Google and iBooks and they don’t offer precisely the same outputs and features on their own devices or on iOS or Android, but the differences are subtle and apparently most people are comfortable with the various consumption experiences.
OverDrive released its lists of the most-downloaded e-books from libraries in December 2011. These lists look pretty different from the current New York Times e-book bestseller lists. Here’s why, plus a few interesting tidbits.
Along with legal struggles over how to price e-books and questions about how the transition to digital books will affect jobs in the publishing industry, e-book editing presents another challenge in the face of changing industry standards.
And while works of literary fiction won’t likely ever offer the equivalent of Wikipedia-style editing, they may be perennially in flux, potentially changing the definition of what a book really is.
In the wake of rumors that book retailer Barnes & Noble will be selling its Sterling publishing unit and the announcement that it is exploring strategic options for its Nook business, analysts say that this might be the beginning of the end for the No. 1 bricks-and-mortar book retailer in the U.S.
“Physical book sales are down and the largest national competitor [Borders] shut its door in 2011,” said Peter Wahlstrom, an analyst at Morningstar who covers Barnes & Noble. “If you look out five years and ask if there are going to be more bookstores or fewer bookstores, I think there will be fewer. Barnes & Noble is facing an uphill, structural industry headwind.”
New York Times E-Book Best Sellers

A version of this list appears in the January 15, 2012 issue of The New York Times Book Review. Rankings reflect sales for the week ending December 31, 2011.

E-Book Fiction

1.                      THE HELP, by Kathryn Stockett
2.                      THE GIRL WITH THE DRAGON TATTOO, by Stieg Larsson
3.                      11/22/63, by Stephen King
4.                      KILL ALEX CROSS, by James Patterson
5.                      THE LITIGATORS, by John Grisham

E-Book Nonfiction

1.                      HEAVEN IS FOR REAL, by Todd Burpo with Lynn Vincent
2.                      STEVE JOBS, by Walter Isaacson
3.                      KILLING LINCOLN, by Bill O'Reilly and Martin Dugard
4.                      UNBROKEN, by Laura Hillenbrand
5.                      Jacqueline Kennedy: Historic Conversations On Life With John F. Kennedy,

Wall Street Journal E-Book Best Sellers (Week Ended Jan. 1)

Nonfiction E-Books
TITLE
AUTHOR / PUBLISHER
THIS WEEK
LAST
WEEK
Heaven Is For Real
1
2
Todd Burpo with Lynn Vincent/Thomas Nelson Publishers
Steve Jobs
2
1
Walter Isaacson/Simon & Schuster
Killing Lincoln
3
3
Bill O'Reilly, Martin Dugard/Henry Holt & Co.
Unbroken
4
4
Laura Hillenbrand/Random House
Jacqueline Kennedy: Historic Conversations on Life With John F. Kennedy
5
Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis/Hyperion
Bossypants
6
6
Tina Fey/Little, Brown
Catherine the Great
7
5
Robert K. Massie/Random House
A Killing in Iowa
8
Rachel Corbett/Byliner Inc.
A Stolen Life
9
Jaycee Dugard/Simon & Schuster
Is Everyone Hanging Out Without Me? (And Other Concerns)
10
Mindy Kaling/Crown Publishing Group


Fiction E-Books
TITLE
AUTHOR / PUBLISHER
THIS WEEK
LAST
WEEK
The Hunger Games
1
1
Suzanne Collins/Scholastic
Catching Fire
2
2
Suzanne Collins/Scholastic
The Help
3
5
Kathryn Stockett/Penguin Group
Mockingjay
4
4
Suzanne Collins/Scholastic
The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo
5
3
Stieg Larsson/Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
The Detachment
6
Barry Eisler/Thomas & Mercer
11/22/63
7
8
Stephen King/Scribner
Kill Alex Cross
8
7
James Patterson/Little, Brown
The Litigators
9
6
John Grisham/Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
Water for Elephants
10
Sara Gruen/Algonquin Books

Vídeos

Traditional vs self-publishing

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