30 de dezembro de 2011

Troca de livros no metropolitano de Londres

Em Londres pondera-se a instalação de uma rede para troca de livros nas estações de metro e nas estações de comboio. A ideia partiu de Chris Gilson, investigador da London School of Economics, e poderá ser implementada ainda a tempo dos Jogos Olímpicos que se realizam na capital inglesa a partir de Julho de 2012.

26 de dezembro de 2011

Fundação José Saramago


Uma amostra do que poderemos encontrar a partir da Primavera de 2012:

Museu dedicado a J.R.R. Tolkien será inaugurado em 2013

O Greisinger Middle-earth Collection Museum, situado em Jenins, na Suiça, abre portas em 2013. Dedicado a Tolkien e ao universo por ele criado, o museu apresentará uma vasta colecção de obras relacionadas com a Terra Média, desde edições raras, ilustrações e esculturas, até réplicas em tamanho real:


Para acompanhar através do Tolkien Library.

25 de dezembro de 2011

Leituras Digitais (18 a 24 de Dezembro)



Rubrica semanal de notícias e artigos relacionados com a edição de livros digitais.

Far from killing off the book, the digital age is proving a boon to innovative publishers and authors, many of whom are using new technology to breathe life back into old ideas. Here, we survey four of the most interesting ventures.
Sony has been working on sugar fueled power sources fro a few years now, and last week they demoed a concept that used paper as the source, not sugar water.
This technically isn’t a battery – not the type you’re used to. Instead this bio-battery uses enzymes to break down the paper fuel into cellulose, which is then processed into glucose (sugar). The glucose is the actual fuel for the battery, and the battery burns the glucose in much the same way as you do in your cells.
It’s been a stormy year for book publishing, with many major players in the industry making big changes. In 2011, Amazon became a publisher, more best-selling authors sprouted out of what once was the slush pile and publishing companies migrated business from print to digital at an accelerated rate.
Some of the events of 2011 were of the “you coulda seen it coming” variety – Borders closing or Random House going to the agency pricing model. Much of it, however, was shocking – think big-six publisher HarperCollins acquiring Nashville-based Christian publisher Thomas Nelson.
Now that 2011 is coming to a close, what’s on tap for 2012?
Clearly the industry faces some big challenges as 2011 comes to a close but if the recent Futurebook conference was anything to go by there does seem to be an undeniable mood of optimism in the air.
Despite the fact that the future seems to be arriving at breakneck speed it seems that publishers who are embracing the changes required are moving into a new and exciting era. The digital future is there for the taking and the UK publishing industry is well placed to stake their claim on it.
"Given that I have today discovered that more illegal copies of my book have been downloaded than I have sold, I am announcing officially that I will not publish another book for a long time," Lucía Etxebarria announced on her Facebook page.
Etxebarria told the Guardian that Spanish authors faced a difficult future as online piracy spreads from music and film to literature.
One thing is certain, however: the global audience for the printed word is now exponentially greater than ever before. Whatever the rows breaking out among the book tribes, this is probably a golden age of reading.
But it's also a transitional decade. We shall look back on these arguments, of which the Hachette Memorandum is a vivid example, as an essential part of the process whereby the book world found a new equilibrium.
Although social reading tools are exciting, they're isolated. As with any other kind of social networking, people using it want to go where their friends are, not to an empty forum. To help draw people in, many social reading services are using Facebook as a connector — but they're just getting started. You might find hundreds of others reading the same book in Kobo, or you might find no one.
That's partly because there are other places to look. U.S.-based Copia was an early player, but European companies have recently debuted more sophisticated interfaces. Launched this summer in Spain and available in seven languages (including English), 24Symbols hopes to be an ebook version of the streaming music service Spotify, highlighting what friends are reading. Berlin-based Readmill, available in English, is focused on sharing content from within books. Openmargin, created in the Netherlands, allows for extended note-sharing within the text of participating books — including "Remix," the 2008 book by Harvard professor Lawrence Lessig.
The UK government has reiterated its view that it cannot bring down value added tax on e-books despite moves by the French and Luxembourg governments to cut tax rates on digital books so they are charged at the same level as those imposed on print books.
Last week, Tom Blenkinsop, the Labour MP for Middlesbrough South and East Cleveland, asked the government if it would consider bringing down the VAT rate on electronic publishing, and this week followed up with a further question asking whether it would follow France in unilaterally bringing the rate down, even though current EU law forbids it.
New York Times E-Book Best Sellers

A version of this list appears in the January 1, 2012 issue of The New York Times Book Review. Rankings reflect sales for the week ending December 17, 2011.

E-Book Fiction

1.                      RED MIST, by Patricia Cornwell
2.                      THE DROP, by Michael Connelly
3.                      THE LITIGATORS, by John Grisham
4.                      KILL ALEX CROSS, by James Patterson
5.                      THE HELP, by Kathryn Stockett

E-Book Nonfiction

1.                      STEVE JOBS, by Walter Isaacson
2.                      HEAVEN IS FOR REAL, by Todd Burpo with Lynn Vincent
3.                      KILLING LINCOLN, by Bill O'Reilly and Martin Dugard
4.                      CATHERINE THE GREAT, by Robert K. Massie
5.                      UNBROKEN, by Laura Hillenbrand

Wall Street Journal E-Book Best Sellers (Week Ended Dec. 11)

Nonfiction E-Books
TITLE
AUTHOR / PUBLISHER
THIS WEEK
LAST
WEEK
Steve Jobs
1
1
Walter Isaacson/Simon & Schuster
Dakota Christmas
2
Joseph Bottum/Joseph Bottum
Heaven Is For Real
3
2
Todd Burpo with Lynn Vincent/Thomas Nelson Publishers
The Suspicions of Mr. Whicher
4
Kate Summerscale/Walker Books
Killing Lincoln
5
5
Bill O'Reilly, Martin Dugard/Henry Holt & Co.
Catherine the Great
6
4
Robert K. Massie/Random House
Unbroken
7
6
Laura Hillenbrand/Random House
Unraveling Anne
8
Laurel Saville/AmazonEncore
The Devil in Pew Number Seven
9
Rebecca Nichols Alonzo with Bob DeMoss/Tyndale House Publishers
Thinking, Fast and Slow
10
Daniel Kahneman/Farrar Straus & Giroux

Fiction E-Books
TITLE
AUTHOR / PUBLISHER
THIS WEEK
LAST
WEEK
Red Mist
1
New
Patricia Cornwell/Penguin Group
The Hunger Games
2
2
Suzanne Collins/Scholastic
Catching Fire
3
3
Suzanne Collins/Scholastic
Mockingjay
4
5
Suzanne Collins/Scholastic
The Drop
5
1
Michael Connelly/Little, Brown
Wife by Wednesday
6
4
Catherine Bybee/Catherine Bybee
The Litigators
7
9
John Grisham/Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
Kill Alex Cross
8
7
James Patterson/Little, Brown
The Help
9
Kathryn Stockett/Penguin Group
11/22/63
10
8
Stephen King/Scribner

22 de dezembro de 2011

Nanozine n.º 4

Já se encontra disponível o novo número da Nanozine, tanto em formato digital, como se pode visualizar abaixo, como em versão impressa, através da Euedito.
Para acompanhar também no blog ou na página oficial no Facebook.

19 de dezembro de 2011

Literatura Gótica na BBC Radio 4

Chris Baldick (In Frankenstein’s Shadow), A.N. Wilson (God’s Funeral) e Emma Clery (The Rise of Supernatural Fiction) discutem as origens da literatura gótica, analisando a influência de autores como Horace Walpole, Ann Radcliffe e Matthew Gregory Lewis, servindo, portanto, como uma boa introdução ao género. O programa encontra-se disponível na íntegra através do BBC Radio Player.
In 1765 Horace Walpole bewitched an unprepared public with the first ever Gothic novel The Castle of Ottranto. The poet Thomas Gray complained the novel made him “afraid to go to bed o’ nights”, and wind swept battlements, mysterious apparitions and armour that goes clang in the night has haunted the dungeons of popular culture ever since. But Gothic is more that novels, and from under its swirling cassock the Gothic Revival in architecture became the state style for an Empire, and the high camp of The Monk reached the acme of seriousness under the influence of John Ruskin.
So how did the Gothic style manage to both sensationalise the public and form, quite literally the pillars of the establishment? Any why does a style forged in the spectral shadows of the Ages of Enlightenment still hold so such a secure position in popular culture today.

18 de dezembro de 2011

Leituras Digitais (11 a 17 de Dezembro)



Rubrica semanal de notícias e artigos relacionados com a edição de livros digitais.

Ao mesmo tempo que a loja Kindle começou a funcionar em Espanha, aconteceu o mesmo em Itália. A loja Kindle italiana passou a disponibilizar 16 mil ebooks em italiano de autores como Roberto Saviano, Tiziano Terzani, Umberto Eco, Susanna Tamaro, Erri De Luca e Marcello Simoni. Além dos “best-sellers”, tal como acontece em Espanha, estão disponíveis gratuitamente centenas de obras clássicas italianas de autores como Luigi Pirandello, Gabrielle D’Annunzio, Edmondo De Amicis, etc. Agora falta uma loja Amazon em português. Tudo indica que no próximo ano a empresa abrirá uma loja no Brasil.
Nos últimos anos, o mercado livreiro tem sofrido alterações profundas: da leitura tradicional do livro impresso, caminha-se para o uso cada vez mais frequente de livros eletrónicos. Em 2011, os e-books representam 2,9% das vendas de livros em todo o mundo, mas estima-se um crescimento até 12,7% em 2015.
Enviámos um questionário por e-mail e newsletter a utilizadores de media digitais de Portugal, Espanha, Itália, Bélgica e Brasil. No total, obtivemos 823 respostas. A maioria dos portugueses que responderam é do sexo masculino (65%) e tem entre 18 e 44 anos (74 por cento). Perguntámos quais os principais motivos para comprar um leitor de e-books, os hábitos de utilização e pedimos que avaliassem os aparelhos que possuem. Para a satisfação, considerámos os resultados relativos à totalidade da amostra.
As I noted earlier, I am not a friend of Amazon. I fear what will happen when the only choice for buying an ebook is Amazon, and Amazon is doing everything it can to hasten that day. It is worrisome when indie authors are willing to jump on Amazon’s bandwagon without looking in depth at Amazon’s KDP program and its exclusivity arrangements and the red flags that should be arising. Instead of joining the herd and singing the mantra “Amazon is my friend, I need not worry,” indie authors should be singing the mantra “Amazon is Amazon’s friend, and I do need to worry.”
Indie authors — and all publishers and authors — need to think and look long-term and not be seduced by the possible but uncertain short-term. The waters are shark infested.
The Future of Writing was a design project commisioned by Microsoft Research Cambridge and the Microsoft Office team, in the summer of 2011, from the Royal College of Art in London. In this project five teams of design alumni from the college took a speculative approach to looking at the way in which authorship may change in the future. The result is five very diverse design ideas and directions, described using video, text, images and interactive prototypes.
A hugely important article crossed my Twitter stream this morning, thanks to Sacha Heck. It said that Luxembourg plans to apply its reduced 3% VAT to ebooks [fr]. At first glance, you might think it shouldn’t matter a whole lot how the tiny country taxes ebooks, but it turns out that the rule in Europe is that VAT is applied according to the seller’s country (not the buyer’s). That means that any company who sells ebooks from Luxembourg will only have to collect 3% VAT.
Next consider that although the reduced rate VAT is applied to print books across the EU, up til now they have insisted on classifying ebooks as services and applying the regular rate. That regular rate ranges anywhere from a current low of 15% (in Luxembourg, surprise!) to 25% in Sweden. The Huffington Post cites this application of the regular VAT rate on ebooks as one of the major reasons Why the UK is behind America for Ebook and E-reader Adoption.
US retailer Barnes & Noble's e-reading device range, the Nook, will be available in the UK in the "not too distant future", though the company has not yet determined whether that will be through a partnership or through creating a B&N presence in the UK.
Speaking at the Publishers Associations' International Conference today (15th December), Theresa Horner, vice-president for digital content for B&N, said: "Our focus originally was very much on providing a successful platform in the US to work from, before taking our product overseas . . . We are working a lot more closely [on that], and I imagine that in the not too distant future you'll be able to find one of these devices here."
While there are isolated cases of e-books costing more than print books, overall, the price of e-books has dropped by 11% since 2009, according to the WSJ report.
Isolated cases and macro-trends aside, for most of the books that people buy, the price has actually dropped significantly since last Christmas.
That’s the real threat for publishers with their antiquated pricing models: Amazon is already eating into their market share on a number of fronts—by making the self-publishing of books as easy as possible (and offering self-publishers monetary incentives to sign deals with Amazon) and by signing up authors to its own digital imprints. Do publishers really want to give the company even more power by pushing consumers of their books away with artificially high prices? Do they need to give Amazon another stick to beat them with?
The irony in this approach, as the WSJ story points out, is that the “agency model” that the major publishers signed with Apple actually results in less money from many titles. In the past, Amazon would give publishers a fixed price for both the printed and the electronic version of a book; then any discounting on the e-book version would come out of Amazon’s pocket. But under the agency model, publishers get 70 percent of the retail price, which for some titles means they wind up with less revenue.
New York Times E-Book Best Sellers

A version of this list appears in the December 25, 2011 issue of The New York Times Book Review. Rankings reflect sales for the week ending December 10, 2011.

E-Book Fiction

1.                      RED MIST, by Patricia Cornwell
2.                      THE DROP, by Michael Connelly
3.                      THE LITIGATORS, by John Grisham
4.                      KILL ALEX CROSS, by James Patterson
5.                      THE HELP, by Kathryn Stockett

E-Book Nonfiction

1.                      STEVE JOBS, by Walter Isaacson
2.                      HEAVEN IS FOR REAL, by Todd Burpo with Lynn Vincent
3.                      KILLING LINCOLN, by Bill O'Reilly and Martin Dugard
4.                      CATHERINE THE GREAT, by Robert K. Massie
5.                      UNBROKEN, by Laura Hillenbrand

Wall Street Journal E-Book Best Sellers (Week Ended Dec. 11)

Nonfiction E-Books
TITLE
AUTHOR / PUBLISHER
THIS WEEK
LAST
WEEK
Steve Jobs
1
1
Walter Isaacson/Simon & Schuster
Dakota Christmas
2
Joseph Bottum/Joseph Bottum
Heaven Is For Real
3
2
Todd Burpo with Lynn Vincent/Thomas Nelson Publishers
The Suspicions of Mr. Whicher
4
Kate Summerscale/Walker Books
Killing Lincoln
5
5
Bill O'Reilly, Martin Dugard/Henry Holt & Co.
Catherine the Great
6
4
Robert K. Massie/Random House
Unbroken
7
6
Laura Hillenbrand/Random House
Unraveling Anne
8
Laurel Saville/AmazonEncore
The Devil in Pew Number Seven
9
Rebecca Nichols Alonzo with Bob DeMoss/Tyndale House Publishers
Thinking, Fast and Slow
10
Daniel Kahneman/Farrar Straus & Giroux


Fiction E-Books
TITLE
AUTHOR / PUBLISHER
THIS WEEK
LAST
WEEK
Red Mist
1
New
Patricia Cornwell/Penguin Group
The Hunger Games
2
2
Suzanne Collins/Scholastic
Catching Fire
3
3
Suzanne Collins/Scholastic
Mockingjay
4
5
Suzanne Collins/Scholastic
The Drop
5
1
Michael Connelly/Little, Brown
Wife by Wednesday
6
4
Catherine Bybee/Catherine Bybee
The Litigators
7
9
John Grisham/Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
Kill Alex Cross
8
7
James Patterson/Little, Brown
The Help
9
Kathryn Stockett/Penguin Group
11/22/63
10
8
Stephen King/Scribner

Infográficos

Vídeos

FLEx Lighting Demo

Hands-on with Kyobo color e-reader

Kyobo 5.7" eReader with Mirasol Display

14 de dezembro de 2011

Incognitum Hactenus: Journal on art, horror, and philosophy

Incognitum Hactenus é uma nova publicação dedicada ao horror, com periodicidade quadrimestral. O primeiro número, editado por Caryn Coleman e Tom Trevatt, pode ser consultado aqui.
Incognitum Hactenus is a new quarterly journal featuring writing on art, horror, and philosophy. Conceived as an ongoing investigation into each sphere and its crossovers, the journal publishes new work by leading international scholars, artists, filmmakers, curators, musicians, and designers. With a focused interest in that which finds an affiliation with horrific contemporaneity and the exposure to radical thought, Incognitum Hactenum reveals the twisting of contingency (that which comes from outside) as it produces new monstrosities. We aim to tear asunder the fleshy belly of the established and expected.

11 de dezembro de 2011

Leituras Digitais (4 a 10 de Dezembro)



Rubrica semanal de notícias e artigos relacionados com a edição de livros digitais.

Hachette Book Group, one of the world’s largest publishing companies, has a response. In a document leaked today to Digital Book World by someone inside the company, Hachette outlines just why publishers are relevant. The company has shown the document internally to employees and externally to a limited number of agents and authors.
“You have to take a long look at what you’re up to and how you’re changing and adapting,” said a Hachette executive who preferred not to be named and who confirmed the authenticity of the document. “We’re all trying to come up with good messaging.”
A Comissão Europeia abriu uma investigação a cinco grandes grupos editoriais que, em parceria com a Apple, terão manipulado e fixado ilegalmente o preço dos livros electrónicos, os ebooks. Esta é a segunda vez este ano que a Apple se vê envolvida num processo destes, depois de o mesmo ter acontecido nos Estados Unidos.
As editoras em questão são a Hachette Livre (Lagardère Publishing, França), a Harper Collins (News Corp., Estados Unidos), a Simon & Schuster (CBS Corp., Estados Unidos), a Penguin (Pearson Group, Reino Unido) e a Verlagsgruppe Georg von Holzbrinck (que detém entre outras a Macmillan, Alemanha) e, segundo o comunicado da Comissão Europeia, envolveram-se numa prática "anti-competitiva que afecta a venda dos ebooks no Espaço Económico Europeu". A abertura de um processo formal de investigação implica que o caso seja tratado com prioridade.
Stross’s point is that Amazon’s dominant market position makes DRM undesirable for publishers because most customers prefer to trade with the largest vendor. In effect, DRM is locking customers out of other e-book formats. This in turn increases Amazon’s market share further, to publishers’ peril, as Amazon is no longer the warm and fuzzy business it was when it started out. On the other hand, publishers could make their books available without DRM, which would mean that they could be viewed on any ebook device. Thus Amazon’s huge market share would have a very strong #2 competitor: the sum of all the other e-book companies. So, publishers, choose: DRM and Amazon’s growing market dominance, or no DRM and a number of vendors able to compete on stronger terms with Amazon.  And, yes, no DRM would probably increase piracy. What’s better, the pirates or Amazon?
Portico and Cambridge University Press have announced an agreement to preserve Cambridge Books Online content with Portico. Portico is a not-for-profit organization offering community-supported digital preservation service for e-journals, e-books and d-collections for libraries and institutions. As part of the agreement, Cambridge University Press will make “an annual contribution” to Portico to support its e-book preservation service.
The addition of titles from Cambridge Books Online brings the total number of e-books committed to the Portico archive to more than 123,000. Beginning in 2011, Portico expanded its preservation services offered to libraries with the introduction of separate e-book and e-journal services, enabling libraries to choose where to invest their preservation resources.  Through this agreement, Cambridge extends its relationship with Portico, which began in 2006 with the publisher’s commitment to deposit its entire list of e-journals in the Portico archive.
Há cerca de 42 bibliotecas públicas portuguesas em testes finais para implementação de uma plataforma que irá permitir aos leitores acederem aos acervos de ebooks em qualquer dispositivo com ligação à Internet. Deste grupo, "10 ou 11 bibliotecas académicas" deverão passar a contar com a possibilidade até ao final do ano.
Atualmente, a plataforma já está a ser usada pela Faculdade de Economia do Porto e pelos Institutos Politécnico de Leiria e de Bragança e, ainda antes do Natal, poderá ganhar espaço no site da Biblioteca Nacional, que também já assinou o protocolo para utilização do sistema, avançou o CEO da empresa que assina o projeto.
Towards the end of his Booker Prize-winning speech, Julian Barnes paid the following compliment to the designer of his novel's jacket: "Those of you who have seen my book, whatever you may think of its contents, will probably agree that it is a beautiful object. And if the physical book, as we've come to call it, is to resist the challenge of the e-book, it has to look like something worth buying, and something worth keeping. So my final expression of gratitude is to the best book designer in town, Suzanne Dean."
Dean herself, creative director at Random House, perhaps unsurprisingly concurs with his sentiments. "I personally spend all day in front of a computer screen," she says. "The last thing I want to do at night is sit in front of another to read my book. I want the real thing." Dean has been a designer for 18 years now, and has created some of our most iconic books, among them Ian McEwan's Atonement, Bret Easton Ellis's Glamorama and Mark Haddon's The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time.
Useful is of course the operative word here, I have no doubt that ereader makers will dream up all manner of “useful” new functions for their ereaders to tempt us to buy them, but I really doubt that they will actually add any real value to the ereader
We have the odd situation of possessing a device that is actually perfectly designed for its primary function, and can thus not really be improved in any meaningful way..  Which is death for any consumer electronics.  They have to keep adding goodies to it in order to stand out above the crowd and thus sell, and thus survive.
Amid all of 2011’s obits for the 300-page object, it’s easy to forget just how limiting the one-size-fits-all template has been for publishing (that one size being about 100,000 words). Why should magazine articles, horror stories for children, and scholarly theses all be molded into one Procrustean bed? The great hidden virtue of e-books—hidden beneath the chatter about their effect on the bottom line—is that they allow stories to be exactly as long as we want them to be. It turns out that many of them work best between 10,000 and 35,000 words long—the makings of a whole new nonfiction genre occupying the virgin territory between articles and hardcovers. It may even be the case that Americans can tolerate serious policy work by academics (like economist Cowen’s e-book hit The Great Stagnation) so long as it isn’t padded out to 500 pages.
This review addresses the question of what exactly should we preserve, and how the digital preservation community and scholars address this question. The paper first introduces the much-abused-term “significant properties,” before revealing how some scholars are of the opinion that characteristics of digital objects to be preserved (i.e., significant properties) can be identified and should be expressed formally, while others are not of that opinion. The digital preservation community’s attempt to expound on the general characteristics of digital objects and significant properties will then be discussed. Finally, the review shows that while there may be ways to identify the technical makeup or general characteristics of a digital object, there is currently no formal and objective methodology to help stakeholders identify and decide what the significant properties of the objects are. This review thus helps open questions and generates a formative recommendation based on expert opinion that expressing an object’s functions in an explicit and formal way (using didactic guides from the archives community) could be the solution to help stakeholders decide what characteristics/ elements exactly we should preserve.
New York Times E-Book Best Sellers

A version of this list appears in the December 18, 2011 issue of The New York Times Book Review. Rankings reflect sales for the week ending December 3, 2011.

E-Book Fiction

1.                      THE DROP, by Michael Connelly
2.                      KILL ALEX CROSS, by James Patterson
3.                      EXPLOSIVE EIGHTEEN, by Janet Evanovich
4.                      11/22/63, by Stephen King
5.                      THE LITIGATORS, by John Grisham

E-Book Nonfiction

1.                      STEVE JOBS, by Walter Isaacson
2.                      HEAVEN IS FOR REAL, by Todd Burpo with Lynn Vincent
3.                      CATHERINE THE GREAT, by Robert K. Massie
4.                      KILLING LINCOLN, by Bill O'Reilly and Martin Dugard
5.                      UNBROKEN, by Laura Hillenbrand

Wall Street Journal E-Book Best Sellers (Week Ended Dec. 4)

Nonfiction E-Books
TITLE
AUTHOR / PUBLISHER
THIS WEEK
LAST
WEEK
Steve Jobs
1
1
Walter Isaacson/Simon & Schuster
Heaven Is For Real
2
2
Todd Burpo with Lynn Vincent/Thomas Nelson Publishers
JFK
3
L. Fletcher Prouty/Skyhorse Publishing
Catherine the Great
4
3
Robert K. Massie/Random House
Killing Lincoln
5
4
Bill O'Reilly, Martin Dugard/Henry Holt & Co.
Unbroken
6
5
Laura Hillenbrand/Random House
Don't Look Behind You and Other True Cases
7
New
Ann Rule/Pocket Books
The Glorious Pasta of Italy
8
Domenica Marchetti/Chronicle Books
Cool, Calm & Contentious
9
Merrill Markoe/Random House
Playbook 2012: The Right Fights Back
10
New
Mike Allen, Evan Thomas, Politico/Random House


Fiction E-Books
TITLE
AUTHOR / PUBLISHER
THIS WEEK
LAST
WEEK
The Drop
1
New
Michael Connelly/Little, Brown
The Hunger Games
2
2
Suzanne Collins/Scholastic
Catching Fire
3
4
Suzanne Collins/Scholastic
Wife by Wednesday
4
Catherine Bybee/Catherine Bybee
Mockingjay
5
7
Suzanne Collins/Scholastic
Explosive Eighteen
6
1
Janet Evanovich/Random House
Kill Alex Cross
7
6
James Patterson/Little, Brown
11/22/63
8
3
Stephen King/Scribner
The Litigators
9
5
John Grisham/Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
Hunter
10
Robert Bidinotto/Robert Bidinotto


Infográficos

Via Teleread.

Vídeos

Ideias em Estante: Manuel Gonçalves Neves
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