11 de dezembro de 2011

Leituras Digitais (4 a 10 de Dezembro)



Rubrica semanal de notícias e artigos relacionados com a edição de livros digitais.

Hachette Book Group, one of the world’s largest publishing companies, has a response. In a document leaked today to Digital Book World by someone inside the company, Hachette outlines just why publishers are relevant. The company has shown the document internally to employees and externally to a limited number of agents and authors.
“You have to take a long look at what you’re up to and how you’re changing and adapting,” said a Hachette executive who preferred not to be named and who confirmed the authenticity of the document. “We’re all trying to come up with good messaging.”
A Comissão Europeia abriu uma investigação a cinco grandes grupos editoriais que, em parceria com a Apple, terão manipulado e fixado ilegalmente o preço dos livros electrónicos, os ebooks. Esta é a segunda vez este ano que a Apple se vê envolvida num processo destes, depois de o mesmo ter acontecido nos Estados Unidos.
As editoras em questão são a Hachette Livre (Lagardère Publishing, França), a Harper Collins (News Corp., Estados Unidos), a Simon & Schuster (CBS Corp., Estados Unidos), a Penguin (Pearson Group, Reino Unido) e a Verlagsgruppe Georg von Holzbrinck (que detém entre outras a Macmillan, Alemanha) e, segundo o comunicado da Comissão Europeia, envolveram-se numa prática "anti-competitiva que afecta a venda dos ebooks no Espaço Económico Europeu". A abertura de um processo formal de investigação implica que o caso seja tratado com prioridade.
Stross’s point is that Amazon’s dominant market position makes DRM undesirable for publishers because most customers prefer to trade with the largest vendor. In effect, DRM is locking customers out of other e-book formats. This in turn increases Amazon’s market share further, to publishers’ peril, as Amazon is no longer the warm and fuzzy business it was when it started out. On the other hand, publishers could make their books available without DRM, which would mean that they could be viewed on any ebook device. Thus Amazon’s huge market share would have a very strong #2 competitor: the sum of all the other e-book companies. So, publishers, choose: DRM and Amazon’s growing market dominance, or no DRM and a number of vendors able to compete on stronger terms with Amazon.  And, yes, no DRM would probably increase piracy. What’s better, the pirates or Amazon?
Portico and Cambridge University Press have announced an agreement to preserve Cambridge Books Online content with Portico. Portico is a not-for-profit organization offering community-supported digital preservation service for e-journals, e-books and d-collections for libraries and institutions. As part of the agreement, Cambridge University Press will make “an annual contribution” to Portico to support its e-book preservation service.
The addition of titles from Cambridge Books Online brings the total number of e-books committed to the Portico archive to more than 123,000. Beginning in 2011, Portico expanded its preservation services offered to libraries with the introduction of separate e-book and e-journal services, enabling libraries to choose where to invest their preservation resources.  Through this agreement, Cambridge extends its relationship with Portico, which began in 2006 with the publisher’s commitment to deposit its entire list of e-journals in the Portico archive.
Há cerca de 42 bibliotecas públicas portuguesas em testes finais para implementação de uma plataforma que irá permitir aos leitores acederem aos acervos de ebooks em qualquer dispositivo com ligação à Internet. Deste grupo, "10 ou 11 bibliotecas académicas" deverão passar a contar com a possibilidade até ao final do ano.
Atualmente, a plataforma já está a ser usada pela Faculdade de Economia do Porto e pelos Institutos Politécnico de Leiria e de Bragança e, ainda antes do Natal, poderá ganhar espaço no site da Biblioteca Nacional, que também já assinou o protocolo para utilização do sistema, avançou o CEO da empresa que assina o projeto.
Towards the end of his Booker Prize-winning speech, Julian Barnes paid the following compliment to the designer of his novel's jacket: "Those of you who have seen my book, whatever you may think of its contents, will probably agree that it is a beautiful object. And if the physical book, as we've come to call it, is to resist the challenge of the e-book, it has to look like something worth buying, and something worth keeping. So my final expression of gratitude is to the best book designer in town, Suzanne Dean."
Dean herself, creative director at Random House, perhaps unsurprisingly concurs with his sentiments. "I personally spend all day in front of a computer screen," she says. "The last thing I want to do at night is sit in front of another to read my book. I want the real thing." Dean has been a designer for 18 years now, and has created some of our most iconic books, among them Ian McEwan's Atonement, Bret Easton Ellis's Glamorama and Mark Haddon's The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time.
Useful is of course the operative word here, I have no doubt that ereader makers will dream up all manner of “useful” new functions for their ereaders to tempt us to buy them, but I really doubt that they will actually add any real value to the ereader
We have the odd situation of possessing a device that is actually perfectly designed for its primary function, and can thus not really be improved in any meaningful way..  Which is death for any consumer electronics.  They have to keep adding goodies to it in order to stand out above the crowd and thus sell, and thus survive.
Amid all of 2011’s obits for the 300-page object, it’s easy to forget just how limiting the one-size-fits-all template has been for publishing (that one size being about 100,000 words). Why should magazine articles, horror stories for children, and scholarly theses all be molded into one Procrustean bed? The great hidden virtue of e-books—hidden beneath the chatter about their effect on the bottom line—is that they allow stories to be exactly as long as we want them to be. It turns out that many of them work best between 10,000 and 35,000 words long—the makings of a whole new nonfiction genre occupying the virgin territory between articles and hardcovers. It may even be the case that Americans can tolerate serious policy work by academics (like economist Cowen’s e-book hit The Great Stagnation) so long as it isn’t padded out to 500 pages.
This review addresses the question of what exactly should we preserve, and how the digital preservation community and scholars address this question. The paper first introduces the much-abused-term “significant properties,” before revealing how some scholars are of the opinion that characteristics of digital objects to be preserved (i.e., significant properties) can be identified and should be expressed formally, while others are not of that opinion. The digital preservation community’s attempt to expound on the general characteristics of digital objects and significant properties will then be discussed. Finally, the review shows that while there may be ways to identify the technical makeup or general characteristics of a digital object, there is currently no formal and objective methodology to help stakeholders identify and decide what the significant properties of the objects are. This review thus helps open questions and generates a formative recommendation based on expert opinion that expressing an object’s functions in an explicit and formal way (using didactic guides from the archives community) could be the solution to help stakeholders decide what characteristics/ elements exactly we should preserve.
New York Times E-Book Best Sellers

A version of this list appears in the December 18, 2011 issue of The New York Times Book Review. Rankings reflect sales for the week ending December 3, 2011.

E-Book Fiction

1.                      THE DROP, by Michael Connelly
2.                      KILL ALEX CROSS, by James Patterson
3.                      EXPLOSIVE EIGHTEEN, by Janet Evanovich
4.                      11/22/63, by Stephen King
5.                      THE LITIGATORS, by John Grisham

E-Book Nonfiction

1.                      STEVE JOBS, by Walter Isaacson
2.                      HEAVEN IS FOR REAL, by Todd Burpo with Lynn Vincent
3.                      CATHERINE THE GREAT, by Robert K. Massie
4.                      KILLING LINCOLN, by Bill O'Reilly and Martin Dugard
5.                      UNBROKEN, by Laura Hillenbrand

Wall Street Journal E-Book Best Sellers (Week Ended Dec. 4)

Nonfiction E-Books
TITLE
AUTHOR / PUBLISHER
THIS WEEK
LAST
WEEK
Steve Jobs
1
1
Walter Isaacson/Simon & Schuster
Heaven Is For Real
2
2
Todd Burpo with Lynn Vincent/Thomas Nelson Publishers
JFK
3
L. Fletcher Prouty/Skyhorse Publishing
Catherine the Great
4
3
Robert K. Massie/Random House
Killing Lincoln
5
4
Bill O'Reilly, Martin Dugard/Henry Holt & Co.
Unbroken
6
5
Laura Hillenbrand/Random House
Don't Look Behind You and Other True Cases
7
New
Ann Rule/Pocket Books
The Glorious Pasta of Italy
8
Domenica Marchetti/Chronicle Books
Cool, Calm & Contentious
9
Merrill Markoe/Random House
Playbook 2012: The Right Fights Back
10
New
Mike Allen, Evan Thomas, Politico/Random House


Fiction E-Books
TITLE
AUTHOR / PUBLISHER
THIS WEEK
LAST
WEEK
The Drop
1
New
Michael Connelly/Little, Brown
The Hunger Games
2
2
Suzanne Collins/Scholastic
Catching Fire
3
4
Suzanne Collins/Scholastic
Wife by Wednesday
4
Catherine Bybee/Catherine Bybee
Mockingjay
5
7
Suzanne Collins/Scholastic
Explosive Eighteen
6
1
Janet Evanovich/Random House
Kill Alex Cross
7
6
James Patterson/Little, Brown
11/22/63
8
3
Stephen King/Scribner
The Litigators
9
5
John Grisham/Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
Hunter
10
Robert Bidinotto/Robert Bidinotto


Infográficos

Via Teleread.

Vídeos

Ideias em Estante: Manuel Gonçalves Neves

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