25 de dezembro de 2011

Leituras Digitais (18 a 24 de Dezembro)



Rubrica semanal de notícias e artigos relacionados com a edição de livros digitais.

Far from killing off the book, the digital age is proving a boon to innovative publishers and authors, many of whom are using new technology to breathe life back into old ideas. Here, we survey four of the most interesting ventures.
Sony has been working on sugar fueled power sources fro a few years now, and last week they demoed a concept that used paper as the source, not sugar water.
This technically isn’t a battery – not the type you’re used to. Instead this bio-battery uses enzymes to break down the paper fuel into cellulose, which is then processed into glucose (sugar). The glucose is the actual fuel for the battery, and the battery burns the glucose in much the same way as you do in your cells.
It’s been a stormy year for book publishing, with many major players in the industry making big changes. In 2011, Amazon became a publisher, more best-selling authors sprouted out of what once was the slush pile and publishing companies migrated business from print to digital at an accelerated rate.
Some of the events of 2011 were of the “you coulda seen it coming” variety – Borders closing or Random House going to the agency pricing model. Much of it, however, was shocking – think big-six publisher HarperCollins acquiring Nashville-based Christian publisher Thomas Nelson.
Now that 2011 is coming to a close, what’s on tap for 2012?
Clearly the industry faces some big challenges as 2011 comes to a close but if the recent Futurebook conference was anything to go by there does seem to be an undeniable mood of optimism in the air.
Despite the fact that the future seems to be arriving at breakneck speed it seems that publishers who are embracing the changes required are moving into a new and exciting era. The digital future is there for the taking and the UK publishing industry is well placed to stake their claim on it.
"Given that I have today discovered that more illegal copies of my book have been downloaded than I have sold, I am announcing officially that I will not publish another book for a long time," Lucía Etxebarria announced on her Facebook page.
Etxebarria told the Guardian that Spanish authors faced a difficult future as online piracy spreads from music and film to literature.
One thing is certain, however: the global audience for the printed word is now exponentially greater than ever before. Whatever the rows breaking out among the book tribes, this is probably a golden age of reading.
But it's also a transitional decade. We shall look back on these arguments, of which the Hachette Memorandum is a vivid example, as an essential part of the process whereby the book world found a new equilibrium.
Although social reading tools are exciting, they're isolated. As with any other kind of social networking, people using it want to go where their friends are, not to an empty forum. To help draw people in, many social reading services are using Facebook as a connector — but they're just getting started. You might find hundreds of others reading the same book in Kobo, or you might find no one.
That's partly because there are other places to look. U.S.-based Copia was an early player, but European companies have recently debuted more sophisticated interfaces. Launched this summer in Spain and available in seven languages (including English), 24Symbols hopes to be an ebook version of the streaming music service Spotify, highlighting what friends are reading. Berlin-based Readmill, available in English, is focused on sharing content from within books. Openmargin, created in the Netherlands, allows for extended note-sharing within the text of participating books — including "Remix," the 2008 book by Harvard professor Lawrence Lessig.
The UK government has reiterated its view that it cannot bring down value added tax on e-books despite moves by the French and Luxembourg governments to cut tax rates on digital books so they are charged at the same level as those imposed on print books.
Last week, Tom Blenkinsop, the Labour MP for Middlesbrough South and East Cleveland, asked the government if it would consider bringing down the VAT rate on electronic publishing, and this week followed up with a further question asking whether it would follow France in unilaterally bringing the rate down, even though current EU law forbids it.
New York Times E-Book Best Sellers

A version of this list appears in the January 1, 2012 issue of The New York Times Book Review. Rankings reflect sales for the week ending December 17, 2011.

E-Book Fiction

1.                      RED MIST, by Patricia Cornwell
2.                      THE DROP, by Michael Connelly
3.                      THE LITIGATORS, by John Grisham
4.                      KILL ALEX CROSS, by James Patterson
5.                      THE HELP, by Kathryn Stockett

E-Book Nonfiction

1.                      STEVE JOBS, by Walter Isaacson
2.                      HEAVEN IS FOR REAL, by Todd Burpo with Lynn Vincent
3.                      KILLING LINCOLN, by Bill O'Reilly and Martin Dugard
4.                      CATHERINE THE GREAT, by Robert K. Massie
5.                      UNBROKEN, by Laura Hillenbrand

Wall Street Journal E-Book Best Sellers (Week Ended Dec. 11)

Nonfiction E-Books
TITLE
AUTHOR / PUBLISHER
THIS WEEK
LAST
WEEK
Steve Jobs
1
1
Walter Isaacson/Simon & Schuster
Dakota Christmas
2
Joseph Bottum/Joseph Bottum
Heaven Is For Real
3
2
Todd Burpo with Lynn Vincent/Thomas Nelson Publishers
The Suspicions of Mr. Whicher
4
Kate Summerscale/Walker Books
Killing Lincoln
5
5
Bill O'Reilly, Martin Dugard/Henry Holt & Co.
Catherine the Great
6
4
Robert K. Massie/Random House
Unbroken
7
6
Laura Hillenbrand/Random House
Unraveling Anne
8
Laurel Saville/AmazonEncore
The Devil in Pew Number Seven
9
Rebecca Nichols Alonzo with Bob DeMoss/Tyndale House Publishers
Thinking, Fast and Slow
10
Daniel Kahneman/Farrar Straus & Giroux

Fiction E-Books
TITLE
AUTHOR / PUBLISHER
THIS WEEK
LAST
WEEK
Red Mist
1
New
Patricia Cornwell/Penguin Group
The Hunger Games
2
2
Suzanne Collins/Scholastic
Catching Fire
3
3
Suzanne Collins/Scholastic
Mockingjay
4
5
Suzanne Collins/Scholastic
The Drop
5
1
Michael Connelly/Little, Brown
Wife by Wednesday
6
4
Catherine Bybee/Catherine Bybee
The Litigators
7
9
John Grisham/Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
Kill Alex Cross
8
7
James Patterson/Little, Brown
The Help
9
Kathryn Stockett/Penguin Group
11/22/63
10
8
Stephen King/Scribner

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