18 de dezembro de 2011

Leituras Digitais (11 a 17 de Dezembro)



Rubrica semanal de notícias e artigos relacionados com a edição de livros digitais.

Ao mesmo tempo que a loja Kindle começou a funcionar em Espanha, aconteceu o mesmo em Itália. A loja Kindle italiana passou a disponibilizar 16 mil ebooks em italiano de autores como Roberto Saviano, Tiziano Terzani, Umberto Eco, Susanna Tamaro, Erri De Luca e Marcello Simoni. Além dos “best-sellers”, tal como acontece em Espanha, estão disponíveis gratuitamente centenas de obras clássicas italianas de autores como Luigi Pirandello, Gabrielle D’Annunzio, Edmondo De Amicis, etc. Agora falta uma loja Amazon em português. Tudo indica que no próximo ano a empresa abrirá uma loja no Brasil.
Nos últimos anos, o mercado livreiro tem sofrido alterações profundas: da leitura tradicional do livro impresso, caminha-se para o uso cada vez mais frequente de livros eletrónicos. Em 2011, os e-books representam 2,9% das vendas de livros em todo o mundo, mas estima-se um crescimento até 12,7% em 2015.
Enviámos um questionário por e-mail e newsletter a utilizadores de media digitais de Portugal, Espanha, Itália, Bélgica e Brasil. No total, obtivemos 823 respostas. A maioria dos portugueses que responderam é do sexo masculino (65%) e tem entre 18 e 44 anos (74 por cento). Perguntámos quais os principais motivos para comprar um leitor de e-books, os hábitos de utilização e pedimos que avaliassem os aparelhos que possuem. Para a satisfação, considerámos os resultados relativos à totalidade da amostra.
As I noted earlier, I am not a friend of Amazon. I fear what will happen when the only choice for buying an ebook is Amazon, and Amazon is doing everything it can to hasten that day. It is worrisome when indie authors are willing to jump on Amazon’s bandwagon without looking in depth at Amazon’s KDP program and its exclusivity arrangements and the red flags that should be arising. Instead of joining the herd and singing the mantra “Amazon is my friend, I need not worry,” indie authors should be singing the mantra “Amazon is Amazon’s friend, and I do need to worry.”
Indie authors — and all publishers and authors — need to think and look long-term and not be seduced by the possible but uncertain short-term. The waters are shark infested.
The Future of Writing was a design project commisioned by Microsoft Research Cambridge and the Microsoft Office team, in the summer of 2011, from the Royal College of Art in London. In this project five teams of design alumni from the college took a speculative approach to looking at the way in which authorship may change in the future. The result is five very diverse design ideas and directions, described using video, text, images and interactive prototypes.
A hugely important article crossed my Twitter stream this morning, thanks to Sacha Heck. It said that Luxembourg plans to apply its reduced 3% VAT to ebooks [fr]. At first glance, you might think it shouldn’t matter a whole lot how the tiny country taxes ebooks, but it turns out that the rule in Europe is that VAT is applied according to the seller’s country (not the buyer’s). That means that any company who sells ebooks from Luxembourg will only have to collect 3% VAT.
Next consider that although the reduced rate VAT is applied to print books across the EU, up til now they have insisted on classifying ebooks as services and applying the regular rate. That regular rate ranges anywhere from a current low of 15% (in Luxembourg, surprise!) to 25% in Sweden. The Huffington Post cites this application of the regular VAT rate on ebooks as one of the major reasons Why the UK is behind America for Ebook and E-reader Adoption.
US retailer Barnes & Noble's e-reading device range, the Nook, will be available in the UK in the "not too distant future", though the company has not yet determined whether that will be through a partnership or through creating a B&N presence in the UK.
Speaking at the Publishers Associations' International Conference today (15th December), Theresa Horner, vice-president for digital content for B&N, said: "Our focus originally was very much on providing a successful platform in the US to work from, before taking our product overseas . . . We are working a lot more closely [on that], and I imagine that in the not too distant future you'll be able to find one of these devices here."
While there are isolated cases of e-books costing more than print books, overall, the price of e-books has dropped by 11% since 2009, according to the WSJ report.
Isolated cases and macro-trends aside, for most of the books that people buy, the price has actually dropped significantly since last Christmas.
That’s the real threat for publishers with their antiquated pricing models: Amazon is already eating into their market share on a number of fronts—by making the self-publishing of books as easy as possible (and offering self-publishers monetary incentives to sign deals with Amazon) and by signing up authors to its own digital imprints. Do publishers really want to give the company even more power by pushing consumers of their books away with artificially high prices? Do they need to give Amazon another stick to beat them with?
The irony in this approach, as the WSJ story points out, is that the “agency model” that the major publishers signed with Apple actually results in less money from many titles. In the past, Amazon would give publishers a fixed price for both the printed and the electronic version of a book; then any discounting on the e-book version would come out of Amazon’s pocket. But under the agency model, publishers get 70 percent of the retail price, which for some titles means they wind up with less revenue.
New York Times E-Book Best Sellers

A version of this list appears in the December 25, 2011 issue of The New York Times Book Review. Rankings reflect sales for the week ending December 10, 2011.

E-Book Fiction

1.                      RED MIST, by Patricia Cornwell
2.                      THE DROP, by Michael Connelly
3.                      THE LITIGATORS, by John Grisham
4.                      KILL ALEX CROSS, by James Patterson
5.                      THE HELP, by Kathryn Stockett

E-Book Nonfiction

1.                      STEVE JOBS, by Walter Isaacson
2.                      HEAVEN IS FOR REAL, by Todd Burpo with Lynn Vincent
3.                      KILLING LINCOLN, by Bill O'Reilly and Martin Dugard
4.                      CATHERINE THE GREAT, by Robert K. Massie
5.                      UNBROKEN, by Laura Hillenbrand

Wall Street Journal E-Book Best Sellers (Week Ended Dec. 11)

Nonfiction E-Books
TITLE
AUTHOR / PUBLISHER
THIS WEEK
LAST
WEEK
Steve Jobs
1
1
Walter Isaacson/Simon & Schuster
Dakota Christmas
2
Joseph Bottum/Joseph Bottum
Heaven Is For Real
3
2
Todd Burpo with Lynn Vincent/Thomas Nelson Publishers
The Suspicions of Mr. Whicher
4
Kate Summerscale/Walker Books
Killing Lincoln
5
5
Bill O'Reilly, Martin Dugard/Henry Holt & Co.
Catherine the Great
6
4
Robert K. Massie/Random House
Unbroken
7
6
Laura Hillenbrand/Random House
Unraveling Anne
8
Laurel Saville/AmazonEncore
The Devil in Pew Number Seven
9
Rebecca Nichols Alonzo with Bob DeMoss/Tyndale House Publishers
Thinking, Fast and Slow
10
Daniel Kahneman/Farrar Straus & Giroux


Fiction E-Books
TITLE
AUTHOR / PUBLISHER
THIS WEEK
LAST
WEEK
Red Mist
1
New
Patricia Cornwell/Penguin Group
The Hunger Games
2
2
Suzanne Collins/Scholastic
Catching Fire
3
3
Suzanne Collins/Scholastic
Mockingjay
4
5
Suzanne Collins/Scholastic
The Drop
5
1
Michael Connelly/Little, Brown
Wife by Wednesday
6
4
Catherine Bybee/Catherine Bybee
The Litigators
7
9
John Grisham/Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
Kill Alex Cross
8
7
James Patterson/Little, Brown
The Help
9
Kathryn Stockett/Penguin Group
11/22/63
10
8
Stephen King/Scribner

Infográficos

Vídeos

FLEx Lighting Demo

Hands-on with Kyobo color e-reader

Kyobo 5.7" eReader with Mirasol Display

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