4 de setembro de 2011

Leituras Digitais (28 de Agosto a 3 de Setembro)



Rubrica semanal de notícias e artigos relacionados com a edição de livros digitais.

  Sony today announced the launch of the lightest touch screen 6" eReader device ever, Reader Wi-Fi (PRS-T1), providing the most natural and immersive reading experience yet for book lovers. The new Reader Wi-Fi builds on the popularity of last year's line, while reducing size and weight and incorporating new and enhanced features. At under 6 ounces and with a 6" E-Ink® Pearl V220 touch screen, Reader Wi-Fi is smaller than an average paperback book, can easily fit into a bag or pocket and is available in three color choices: black, red or white.
  Alongside Kindle (AZW) and Kindle (Topaz), Amazon now sell “print replica” ebooks. This is a completely new format and you need to update to the latest version of K4PC in order to use it.  (It’s also US only, darnit.) If you read the help pages, it sounds like Amazon have created a format that is something like PDF.
  You only have to look at the numbers. Apple’s share of the tablet market is over 61% and growing, while all the Android tablets together make up barely 30% and are being squeezed. According to Strategy Analytics of Newton, Massachusetts, Windows tablets account for 4.6% and Research in Motion’s 3.3%. Sooner or later, the rest of the iPad wannabes are going to realise that, just because Apple has a runaway success on its hands, they cannot charge Apple prices for their hastily developed me-too products and expect consumers to clamour for them.
  What does all this data add up to? Hardly an industry in its death throes, so one must ask why there are so many long faces about the place. Let's not be naive. These are times of massive change, and change is never, ever comfortable. The retail sector worries publishers and authors alike; in the past year, publishers have lost Woolworth, Borders and British Bookshops as sales channels and, as Kate Pool from the Society of Authors says: "The increasing dominance of Amazon (as retailer, increasingly as publisher, as owner of the Kindle, etc) is potentially very worrying."
  How would you like to ask the author a question about the book while you’re reading it? You’re going to need a Twitter account (and a participating author), but  now you can.
Simply open the Kindle ebook (it has to be one Amazon sold you), highlight a passage and type @author and your question. If you’re following the author on kindle.amazon.com, the question and the author’s answer will both become Public Notes in your book. The question and answer will also be visible on the author’s page on kindle.amazon.com.
  Spanish is the third most spoken language in the world after English and Chinese, and the revenue potential from a market made of 500 million Spanish speakers will not be overlooked. As we all know, the Internet has no frontiers and, therefore, once the English content market consolidates, the main international players will enrich their catalogs with content from other potential markets, especially the Spanish one. Barnes & Noble has already initiated this race towards globalization by aggregating more than 40,000 Spanish titles from various Spanish and Latin American publishers and offering them for sale online — an approach that will soon be imitated by the rest of the international players.
  According to a recent survey of 600 publishers across the trade, professional, and educational markets, the biggest struggle publishers face is maximizing ebook profits as the industry struggles to go digital. Part of the profit problem will be solved as publishers reduce production expenses by moving to scalable digital workflows, rather than retrofitting existing, outdated and inefficient publishing processes. While saving money by increasing productivity and reducing expenses is an important part of gaining a positive return on investment from ebooks and apps, maximizing profits also requires publishers to find innovative ways of earning revenue and turning those dollars into profit.
  What if you could ask the author of a book a question while you were reading the book? That’s the kind of world Amazon wants to offer with its new @author feature, which the online bookstore launched on Wednesday with a group of writers including Susan Orlean and self-help guru Tim Ferriss. Readers can ask questions directly from their Kindles while they are reading a book, and the question gets sent to the author’s Twitter account as well as to their home page at Amazon. In addition to creating what the company hopes will be a kind of reader community around Kindle titles — something it has been pushing in other ways as well — this new feature looks like another step in Amazon’s quest to cut publishers out of the equation and build relationships directly with authors.
  Our good friends at Digitimes have picked up on new orders from Barnes & Noble.  They’re getting hints that Barnes & Noble are about to release a new ebook reader and that it’s supposed to be announced soon. According to their sources the NC2 is going to be another 7″ model with a number of details in common with the current NookColor.
  It’s called simply the “Amazon Kindle”. But it’s not like any Kindle you’ve seen before. It displays content in full color. It has a 7-inch capacitive touch screen. And it runs Android.
Rumors of Amazon making a full-fledged tablet device have persisted for a while. I believe we were one of the first to report on the possibility from a credible source — the same person who accurately called Amazon’s Android Appstore. That source was dead-on again, it just took Amazon longer than anticipated to get the device ready to go. They’re now close.
  A comprehensive survey released last month by the Association of American Publishers and the Book Industry Study Group revealed that while the publishing industry had expanded over all, publishers’ mass-market paperback sales had fallen 14 percent since 2008.
“Five years ago, it was a robust market,” said David Gernert, a literary agent whose clients include John Grisham, a perennial best seller in mass market. “Now it’s on the wane, and e-books have bitten a big chunk out of it.”
New York Times E-Book Best Sellers

  These lists are an expanded version of those appearing in the September 11, 2011 print edition of the Book Review, reflecting sales for the week ending August 27, 2011.

E-Book Fiction

1.                      THE HELP, by Kathryn Stockett
2.                      BLIND FAITH, by CJ Lyons
3.                      SECOND SON, by Lee Child
4.                      THE ABBEY, by Chris Culver
5.                      WATER FOR ELEPHANTS, by Sara Gruen

E-Book Nonfiction

1.                      HEAVEN IS FOR REAL, by Todd Burpo with Lynn Vincent
2.                      A STOLEN LIFE, by Jaycee Dugard
3.                      UNBROKEN, by Laura Hillenbrand
4.                      IN THE GARDEN OF BEASTS, by Erik Larson
5.                      BOSSYPANTS, by Tina Fey

Vídeos

Sony Reader™ Wi-Fi® PRS-T1

Sony Reader WiFi hands-on

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